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December 2000 - Issue 0
Progressive Rock CD Reviews
Ajalon - The Light At the End of the Tunnel
Review by G. W. Hill
This album is a progressive rock work of considerable merit, whose lyrical content consists of competent and well-written Christian themes. The musicianship on this album is quite inspired and competent, and the album also features some strong vocals.
Alaska - Alaska
Review by G. W. Hill
Alaska, the debut album by the band of the same name, features progressive rock arrangements which hint at the styles of ELP, Yes and others. For the most part, the arrangements are predominately keyboard based, but there is some nice guitar work present as well.
Ancient Vision - Focus or Blinders
Review by G. W. Hill
There are many people out there who have been searching for new progressive rock bands, but have been getting turned off by the heavy metal leanings that most of them have. If you are one of those people, this album is the answer to your quest.
Jon Anderson - 3 Ships
Review by G. W. Hill
This Christmas disc by Yesman Jon Anderson features some traditional and some original holiday music. The songs vary from fairly traditional (but modernized) to quite modern.
Anubis Spire - Old Lions (In the World of Snarling Sheep)
Review by G. W. Hill
This is the debut album by this band, and the title to this album is definitely among my favorite titles of all time. The album combines diverse influences, ranging from Pink Floyd to Hawkwind, Rush and even Genesis, with minimalistic chord patterns and covers much of them with tasty guitar soloing.
Arena - Immortal
Review by G. W. Hill
A fine concept album, this one has many great prog elements, most notably Pink Floyd and Marillion. The Marillion sounds are a natural, since this band was formed by former Marillo Mick Pointer along with Pendragon's Clive Nolan.
Ray Ashley - 3 Hour Detour
Review by G. W. Hill
This release by Ashley, working under the name Three Hour Detour is a good prog release with echoes of such artists as The Allman Brothers, Kansas, Tempest and King Crimson. Other influences represented here include fusion.
Ray Ashley - Cinema Inferno
Review by G. W. Hill
Although I am listing this disc as being by Ray Ashley, the credit on here is actually to the "Cinema Inferno Orchestra." However, the side of the CD sleeve says, "Ray Ashley", so that is the reason I chose that label for it.
Asia - Archiva 1
Review by G. W. Hill
This album really is a very pop oriented album. It is included in the progressive section of the reviews because both Geoff Downes and Steve Howe are on the album.
Asia - Rare
Review by G. W. Hill
This disc is a bit of a paradox. Although it was released under the moniker of Asia, the material here was actually recorded by just Geoff Downes and David Payne.
Attention Deficit - Attention Deficit
Review by G. W. Hill
Described as "mad scientist rock", this album contains very intriguing instrumental music. With strong leanings toward modern King Crimson, the album covers progressive territory in a dark, gritty and somewhat chaotic manner.
Ayreon - Flight Of The Migrator Universal Migrator (Part 2)
Review by G. W. Hill
Dutch band Ayreon has released two albums together as two parts of one story. The discs both have very different sounds, and a large cast of supporting musicians.
Ayreon - The Dream Sequencer Universal Migrator (Part 1)
Review by G. W. Hill
Dutch band Ayreon has released two albums together as two parts of one story. The discs both have very different sounds, and a large cast of supporting musicians. This disc is the more melodic, song-oriented mode.
Tony Banks - Still
Review by G. W. Hill
Featuring both progressive and pop leanings, this solo album from Genesis keysman Tony Banks is a strong effort. There are some wonderful moments here, and no real throw away tracks.
Bellaphon - Firefly
Review by G. W. Hill
This Japanese release from 1987 is a very entertaining instrumental progressive rock album. Many influences are represented here including Yes, Genesis and jazz.
Birdsongs of the Mesozoic - Petrophonics
Review by G. W. Hill
If you are a fan of off kilter, instrumental prog with jazzy overtones; do yourself a favor and check out this band. The sound is really all their own, although comparisons to early King Crimson are justified.
Boud Deun - The Stolen Bicycle
Review by G. W. Hill
The Stolen Bicycle is a very entertaining prog rock instrumental work that has much in common with the music of King Crimson. The musicianship here is very solid and this is a very well conceived album.
Bozzio, Levin, Stevens - Black Light Syndrome
Review by G. W. Hill
This album by Terry Bozzio, Tony Levin and Steve Stevens is a very wonderful work. Combining elements of Red era King Crimson, jazz, and other sources,the musicianship is impeccable.
Bozzio, Levin, Stevens - Situation Dangerous
Review by Steve Alspach
 Red-era King Crimson's may claim to being the best guitar-bass-drums setup in progressive rock, but Terry Bozzio, Tony Levin, and Steve Stevens are more than willing to challenge that assumption with their latest work, "Situation Dangerous". The album shows three musicians at the top of their games.
Bruford Levin Upper Extremities - BLUE Nights
Review by G. W. Hill
This recording chronicles the live performances of Bruford Levin Upper Extremities from 1998. The disc showcases the band's unique blend of jazzy modes with Crimsonesque textures and, occassionally, just plain weirdness.
Bruford Levin Upper Extremities - Bruford Levin Upper Extremities
Review by G. W. Hill
The musicians on this disc are Bill Bruford (Yes, King Crimson), Tony Levin (King Crimson; Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman and Howe; Bozzio, Levin, Stevens; Liquid Tension Experiment), David Torn (Mark Isham, Bill Bruford), and Chris Botti(Paul Simon, Blue Nile).
Bruford - One of A Kind
Review by Steve Alspach
I remember buying this album in 1979 and the woman who sold me this album said, "Oh, you'll love this album. It is so much fun!" I had heard albums described in a number of ways, but "fun"?
Cairo (USA) - Cairo
Review by Gary Hill
Cairo, the debut album by the progressive rock band of the same name, includes many diverse influences. Cairo takes classic progressive/art rock influences and updates them with modern twists.
Cairo (USA) - Conflict and Dreams
Review by G. W. Hill
Conflict and Dreams is the second album by San Francisco based progressive rock band Cairo , and was nearly two years in the making. The influences apparent on this album read like a who`s who of progressive rock, including UK, Yes, ELP and Genesis.
Caliban - Caliban
Review by G. W. Hill
Included in the prog section because Tempest is a progressive band, and this band is a spin off of that one, this album is a Celtic work that is strong and quite traditional. Caliban (Lief Sorbye and Michael Mullen) are joined on this release by Robert Berry. Visit the Tempest website at www.tempestmusic.com.
Oscar Caraballo - Yesterday Is Tomorrow
Review by G. W. Hill
In the `70`s a Japanese musician named Tomita recorded electronic, keyboard dominated interpretations of various musical pieces. On this album, Oscar Caraballo seems to be giving the same treatment to Yes music.
Cobweb Strange - Sounds From The Gathering
Review by G. W. Hill

Cobweb Strange (Wade Summerlin, Derek Rinehart and Keith Rinehart) dish out an intriguingly dark album with solid helpings of both metal and prog styles. For ordering info, email the band atcobwebstrange@hotmail.com . Tell them that you read about it here.

Dangerous Odds - The Best of Dangerous Odds, Vol. 2
Review by Vivian Lee
Dangerous Odds are Al Jewer (flute, woodwind synthesizer, sax, bass), Art Durkee (Chapman stick), Tom Hamer (drums), Diedre Buckley (viola), Ron Ellis (poet), Larry Giles (poetry, voice). Guests include Biff Blumfumgangne, and Ross Nielsen with Heather Figi, Kristina Hord, Blain Kennedy, Rick Murphy listed as special guests.
Delivery - Fools Meeting
Review by G. W. Hill
Featuring members of such bands as Camel, Gong and Soft Machine in musical performances that predate those bands, this disc shows the talent of a very early progressive rock band. Delivery was rooted as heavily in the hippie psychedelia as they were in what was to become prog, but they certainly showed plenty of prog muscle.
Dixie Dregs - What If
Review by Steve Alspach
What If was the second album by the Dixie Dregs, released in 1978. The band left Capricorn after one album and signed to Polydor (which may have been a good move - those who had never heard the band would not be blamed if they thought that this band from Miami, signed to Capricorn, would be another southern-fried boogie band).
Djam Karet - Burning the Hard City
Review by G. W. Hill
Fans of guitar dominated instrumental prog rejoice. Burning the Hard City by Djam Karet has been reissued. This band pulls off progressive rock changes and metallic power all the while blending it with very listenable grooves.
Djam Karet - Live at Orion
Review by G. W. Hill
Combining elements of King Crimson, Rush, Zappa, Steve Vai and others as diverse as the Allman Brothers, this album is a very strong guitar dominated instrumental prog work. The disc does not come across as blind noodling, as some of this genre does.
Djam Karet - Reflections From The Firepool
Review by G. W. Hill
Another Djam Karet CD being reissued on the Cuneiform label, this one is a great album, still firmly in the band's trademark style. Honestly, when you pick up a new album by this group, you pretty much know what you are getting. In this case, that is not a bad thing.
Djam Karet - Suspension and Displacement
Review by G. W. Hill
Pink Floyd is a big influence on this album, as are King Crimson and Hawkwind. The album was recorded at the same time as Burning the Hard City, but is much more sedate than that album.
Dream Theater - Falling Into Infinity
Review by G. W. Hill
There are those who feel that Dream Theater is not a progressive rock band. However, this album contains many factors indigenous to progressive rock.
Dream Theater - Once In A Livetime
Review by Sean Faust
For the past 9 years, progressive virtuosos Dream Theater (currently Mike Portnoy, John Petrucci, John Myung, James LaBrie and Derek Sherinian) have been blessing the music world with their highly textured (and sometimes ethereal) music and thought-provoking lyrics.
Dream Theater - Scenes From A Memory
Review by Vivian Lee
Since 1985, the five-man outfit named Dream Theater has offered progressive rock fans thoughtful and emotional music that makes them marvel and ask, how do they do that? DT's brand of prog vividly shows eclectic, hard-to-place influences, which include jazz, neo-classical, and ethnic music forms.
Eclat - En Concert
Review by G. W. Hill
Hailing from France, this prog rock outfit does music a bit in the styles of UK, Genesis and others with a definite fusion tilt to it. The guitar on this album really steals the show in many places.
Emerson, Lake and Palmer - King Biscuit
Review by G. W. Hill
A compilation of tracks from two ELP performances are presented here in a double disc set. These performances are from the King Biscuit Flower Hour radio show.
Emerson, Lake and Palmer - Then And Now
Review by G. W. Hill
This two disc set is a live album featuring performances from two different ELP eras, "then" and "now". The "then" material is from Cal Jam `74, and the "now" is from shows on the most recent tour.
Enchant - A Blueprint of the World
Review by G. W. Hill
Although, perhaps more progressive than metal, this album still seems to fit fairly well into this category. The musicianship and song writing on this disc are quite accomplished.
Explorer's Club - Age of Impact
Review by G. W. Hill
This album could well be the most important progressive disc of the decade for two reasons. Firstly, by the sheer magnitude of performers on this CD.
Fish - Internal Exile
Review by G. W. Hill
The lineup on this album is Fish(Derek W. Dick), Mickey Simmonds, Robin Boult, Frank Usher, David Paton, Ethan Johns, Ted McKenna and assorted side-musicians. Internal Exile was released in 1992.
Fish - Raingods With Zippos
Review by G. W. Hill
While moving in fresh and original directions, this album also captures some of the magic of Fish`s former band Marillion. It seems to take progressive rock to another stage, utilizing much of the magic and beauty of the format, while bringing a new accessibility to the style.
Flash - Psychosync
Review by G. W. Hill
When Peter Banks left Yes, he formed the band Flash. The group, rightly so, sounded quite a bit like early Yes.
Pamela Fleming - Fearless Dreamer
Review by G. W. Hill
Essentially a jazz album, this work does include influences of prog rock and more pop oriented music. The disc is a very enjoyable listen and features some fine musicianship from all of the players.
The Flower Kings - Alive on Planet Earth
Review by G. W. Hill
This live album by The Flower Kings shows that they are not just a studio phenomenon. The disc should be evidence to the prog fan that this band is one to catch live as well.
The Flower Kings - Flower Power
Review by G. W. Hill
The Flower Kings sound contains elements and leanings of the classic prog of the '70's, but is definitely still their own. Since the Stardust We Are disc, the band's writing skills seem to have matured.
The Flower Kings - Space Revolver
Review by G. W. Hill
The newest release from the Flower Kings finds them both staying true to their trademark sound and moving in new and unusual directions. We definitely find signs of both on this potent album
The Flower Kings - Stardust We Are
Review by G. W. Hill
This album is the latest by Swedish band The Flower Kings. Featuring a fresh approach on influences from many classic prog bands, this is a strong release.
Forever Einstein - One Thing After Another
Review by G. W. Hill
This is a very unique, creative and enchanting album. For fans of unusual guitar based instrumentals, this one is nearly a "must have".
Genesis - Calling All Stations
Review by G. W. Hill
This album has been causing as much controversy among Genesis fans as Open Your Eyes has among Yes fans. Again many really like the album, while others hate it.
Gentle Giant - Playing the Fool
Review by Steve Alspach
Gentle Giant, at the time that this record was released, had a legacy of albums that demonstrated that the band was able to combine flat-out rock with some of the more complicated counterpoint arrangements found in progressive music.
Trey Gunn - The Joy of Molybdenum
Review by G. W. Hill
A side project of King Crimson member Trey Gunn, this disc may well be an early contender for best CD of the year. The disc combines Crimsonesque tones in very listenable grooves that really work well.
Steve Hackett - Tokyo Tapes
Review by Steve Alspach
1999 was a busy year for Steve Hackett. He saw the Original Masters releases of "Guitar Noir," "There Are Many Sides to the Night," and this CD, a 2 disc set recorded from a 1996 concert in Tokyo.
Steve Hackett - Watcher of the Skies
Review by G. W. Hill
Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett has assembled a wide variety of musicians to rework many classic Genesis songs. The end result is quite interesting.
Halloween - Laz
Review by G. W. Hill
Most of the lyrics to this album are poems written by the late horror writer H. P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). The music is fusion-tinged progressive rock.
Happy The Man - Beginnings
Review by G. W. Hill
This disc, actually a compilation of previous unreleased early recordings by the band, has some very good compositions, but does suffer in places from poor recording conditions.
Happy The Man - Crafty Hands
Review by Steve Alspach
One Way records saw fit to re-release both albums from Happy the Man, an instrumental progressive outfit lying somewhere between Genesis and the Dregs musically.
Happy The Man - Death's Crown
Review by G. W. Hill
Happy the Man was a US based prog band in the 1970's. The sound of the band was similar to many of the greats of prog, while forging out its own uniqueness.
Hawkwind - Epoch Eclipse
Review by G. W. Hill
Chronicling the entire career of the band, this box set really is a wonderful collection. It shows the diversity of Hawkwind in all their varying styles.
Hawkwind - In Your Area
Review by G. W. Hill
One part live album, one part studio, In Your Area shows Hawkwind doing space rock as they are the experts in doing. The album includes several long time Hawk favorites, and several new cuts.
Hawkwind - Levitation
Review by G. W. Hill
Jim Lascko from Strange Trips, the US source for information on Hawkwind, describes space rock as being "characterized (by)(but certainly not limited to) spacey keyboards, driving guitar...
Hawkwind - Weird Tapes 2 - Hawkwind Live and Hawklords Studio
Review by G. W. Hill
In terms of number of albums released, Hawkwind is arguably the most prolific rock band in history. I once read a listing of all Hawkwind releases from several years ago and the number was somewhere in the 80’s.
Tracy Hitchings - From Ignorance To Ecstasy
Review by G. W. Hill
A reissue of this solo outing by Landmark vocalist Tracy Hitchings, this disc is almost more pop than prog.
Steve Hogarth - Ice Cream Genius
Review by Gary Hill
This solo effort from Marillion front man Steve Hogarth is a very entertaining disc that covers many musical styles. The music moves from playful to contemplative to pop to prog with a proficiency and ease that is quite impressive. "
Steve Howe - Not Necessarily Acoustic
Review by G. W. Hill
This album was recorded on Howe`s first solo tour, and is, not necessarily acoustic, but strictly acoustic, nonetheless. The performances show the many sides of this Yes guitarist, and just how much variety can be found in acoustic guitar music when it comes from the right source.
Steve Howe - Quantum Guitar
Review by G. W. Hill
Steve Howe`s solo albums seem to hold a wide variety of music within. Generally, one can find acoustic guitar solos, progressive rock compositions, country tinged songs and more.
Hughscore - Delta Flora
Review by G. W. Hill
Low key and rather jazzy; this is an intriguing prog album. Really a nice change of pace, and interesting direction for the genre to go in. In the tradition of the great prog experimentation of the '70's, this is a new and very original sound.
Ice Age - The Great Divide
Review by G. W. Hill
It would be easy to describe this album by saying that it is very Dream Theater influenced. It would also be somewhat inaccurate. Yes, there are a lot of Dream Theater influences throughout, but there are other leanings here as well.
IO - Strange Tales From The Urban Circle
Review by G. W. Hill
In fairly sedate prog modes, this is Canadian prog. The band seems a lot more interested in creating strong melody lines and coherent songs than they are in who is going to take a solo and in what way to enshrine the instrumental break.
Izz - Sliver of A Sun
Review by G. W. Hill

Definitely progressive rock in the '70's tradition, this album takes elements of many classic prog bands and combines them into a mix all their own. Among the bands who Izz seems to give a stylistic nod to are Yes, Genesis, UK, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, and Renaissance.

Jethro Tull - Crest of A Knave (Reissue)
Review by G. W. Hill
Part of a series of reissue released this year, this is a fine Tull album, although not really from their classic period. In fact, it was this disc that found the band taking “Best Metal Artist” Grammy in the first year of that award.
Jethro Tull - J-Tull Dot Com
Review by G. W. Hill
Arguably Jethro Tull's strongest album in quite some time, this one really captures the Tull sounds from every era and combines them into a smorgasbord of potent music. The band seems to add new elements to the mix and come out with an album that is certainly not tied to the sound of one period of the band, or one style of music.
Kansas - Somewhere to Elsewhere
Review by G. W. Hill
Somewhere to Elsewhere finds Kansas back to their older styles while still being innovative and originally. Fans of the classic prog era of this band should really be able to sink their teeth into this release.
Kansas - Two For The Show
Review by
Kansas rode their crest of popularity in the late seventies with this two-album set that displays their fine skills. Released after "Point of Know Return," this album was recorded during several concert performances at various venues in the U.S. in 1977 and 1978.
King Crimson - The Construkction of Light
Review by G. W. Hill
King Crimson has always been an enigmatic group. The band has basically had three previous incarnations; '60's/'70's, '80's and the '90's versions.
Lands End - (d)rainage
Review by G. W. Hill
The latest Lands End disc is an intriguing chronicle of a very promising prog band.
Lands End - An Older Land
Review by G. W. Hill
Lands End`s music combines textural layering with emotional intensity and progish arrangements in a wonderfully original combination that really pleases. This album features Jeff McFarland, Francisco Neto, Mark Lavallee and Fred Hunter.
Lands End - Natural Selection
Review by G. W. Hill
Lands End is Mark Lavallee, Fred Hunter, Francesco Neto and Jeff McFarland. This album is a wonderful piece of music which deftly combines elements such as Pink Floyd, Marillion, Genesis and Yes and comes up with an original and very intriguing work.
Lands End - Pacific Coast Highway
Review by G. W. Hill
This is a strong entry from prog rockers Lands End and includes The Last Word, a standard of the California based band.
Lands End - Terra Serranum
Review by G. W. Hill
Considered by many to be one of the best Lands End albums, this is a very strong prog rock work. Influences that can be heard on the CD are King Crimson, Hawkwind, Genesis and others.
Lana Lane - Secrets of Astrology
Review by G. W. Hill
Lana Lane has a spectacular voice. Honestly, any review of a CD of hers, could at least start with, if not consist almost entirely of that statement.
Tony Levin - From the Caves of the Iron Mountain
Review by G. W. Hill
This album is an incredibly unique work, beautiful and very difficult to categorize. The musicians on the album are Tony Levin, Jerry Marotta and Steve Gorn.
Tony Levin - Waters of Eden
Review by Vivian Lee
Since the age of ten, bassist/stick-player Tony Levin has been a chameloid powerhouse in the world of music, having played with artists like Seal, Peter Paul and Mary, and Andy Summers; or with supergroups like King Crimson, Bruford Levin Upper Extremities and Liquid Tension Experiment.
Tony Levin - World Diary
Review by G. W. Hill
Featuring a large number of diverse musicians, this album is a considerably varied work. Released in 1995, jazz, art rock, and world textures dominate in this unique and intriguing CD, Tony Levin`s first solo album and the first release on his Papa Bear label.
Liquid Tension Experiment - Liquid Tension Experiment
Review by Gary Hill
This album by Tony Levin (King Crimson, Peter Gabriel, Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman and Howe), Jordan Rudess (Dregs, Rudess Morgenstein) and Mike Portnoy and John Petrucci (both of Dream Theater), much like the Black Light Syndrome CD by Bozzio, Levin, Stevens was written and recorded over the course of six days (with the exception of some keyboard and guitar overdubs).
Liquid Tension Experiment - Liquid Tension Experiment 2
Review by Gary Hill
If you are into prog, and buy only one album this year, by all means, make it this one. The first Liquid Tension Experiment album was wonderful, and this one is even better.
The Lonely Bears - Injustice
Review by Gary Hill
The personnel on this album are Tony Hymas (Jeff Beck, Jack Bruce, Ian Anderson), Terry Bozzio (Bozzio, Levin, Stevens; Frank Zappa; UK), Hugh Burns (Gerry Rafferty, Steelers Wheel), and Tony Coe (Spencer Davis, Henry Mancini, Caravan).
The Lonely Bears - The Bears are Running
Review by Gary Hill
A new release in that it is only now being released in the US, this album has been available in Europe for quite some time. The Lonely Bears catalog is just now being released in America on the Magna Carta label.
The Lonely Bears - The Best of the Lonely Bears
Review by Gary Hill
The personnel on this album are Tony Hymas (Jeff Beck, Jack Bruce, Ian Anderson), Terry Bozzio (Bozzio, Levin, Stevens; Frank Zappa; UK), Hugh Burns (Gerry Rafferty, Steelers Wheel), and Tony Coe (Spencer Davis, Henry Mancini, Caravan). T
The Lonely Bears - The Lonely Bears
Review by Gary Hill
Featuring modes that are both prog and traditional jazz, this is a strong CD by a talented bunch of musicians. The melody seems to be a very important part of the music on this album.
Machiavel - Live
Review by Gary Hill
This one is hard to place in a category. Much of the album fits into metal, but other music here is prog, and some of it is neither prog nor metal.
Machiavel - Virtual Sun
Review by Gary Hill
Virtual Sun is the latest by Belgian band Machiavel. It is definitely prog, but is also highly influenced by Zeppelin, and the dark side of music, somewhat in the vein of Marilyn Manson.
Mama Sutra - 3
Review by Vivian Lee
Mama Sutra is an independent acoustic trio from Raleigh, North Carolina. Formed in 1998, the present lineup is Rick Frye (lead and backing vocals), Jeff Tinling (guitar and backing vocals), and Jason Schmidt (percussion, drums, keyboards, fretless bass, guitars, and backing vocals).
Mannheim Steamroller - Fresh Aire Christmas
Review by Gary Hill
Featuring a sound that is well based in classical and traditional music, this album is rather progish at times. In fact, there are moments that call to mind such people as Rick Wakeman and Mike Oldfield.
Marillion - Marillion.com
Review by Gary Hill
Seeming to maintain some of the style of Radiation, this album also hearkens back to an older Marillion era while still reaching into the future.
Marillion - Radiation
Review by Gary Hill
Radiation is an album that shows a band stretching so far from their origins that they are essentially redefining themselves
Mastermind - Angels of the Apocalypse
Review by Vivian Lee
On a friend's recommendation I gave Mastermind's newest a listen. Though Mastermind is relatively new to my ears, I recognized familiar elements of prog metal - crunchy, waily guitars, throbbing bass guitar and pounding drum section and keys and vocals delivering rhythmic beats, amazing melodies and virtuoso compositions with cerebral themes.
Mind's Eye - Waiting for the Tide
Review by Steve Alspach
Five things that are done very well in Sweden:
1) Meatballs
2) Women
The Moody Blues - A Question of Balance
Review by Steve Alspach
The fourth album released by the Moody Blues between 1967 and 1972, A Question of Balance was the first album by the Moodies that didn't have any sort of coherent theme to it. It was still an influential album.
Neal Morse - Neal Morse
Review by Steve Alspach
On "Day for Night," Spock's Beard songwriter, frontman, and head whisker Neal Morse said that he wanted to put emphasis on the songs rather than the long suites so prevalent on their first few albums.
Steve Morse - Major Impacts
Review by Gary Hill
Steve Morse has come up with a very intriguing concept for an album in this release. The disc is an all instrumental excursion through his varied influences.
Mullmuzzler - Keep It To Yourself
Review by Gary Hill
Although bearing a band name, this album is actually the solo album of Dream Theater`s lead singer James LaBrie.
Nektar - Recycled
Review by Gary Hill
Recycled is arguably the masterwork by this fairly obscure progressive rock band. Basically an epic piece divided into 11 movements, Recycled utilizes the tools of progressive rock (both unique and reminiscent of other bands) to create a very interesting piece of work.
New Sun - Affects
Review by Gary Hill
Seeming a bit more true progressive rock (as opposed to prog metal) than the last album, this release shows that the band has made progress in their sound and song writing.
Niacin - Deep
Review by Gary Hill
This album captures a nice retro and jazzy sort of prog texture. It does this, almost completely, without the addition of guitar and vocals.
Erik Norlander - Into the Sunset
Review by Gary Hill
This solo release from Rocket Scientist Erik Norlander is a very strong CD. He enlists the aid of quite a few of his friends to pull the disc together, and the result a very solid prog CD with some metallic elements.
Mike Oldfield - Incantations
Review by Steve Alspach
"Incantations," released in 1978, may have been Mike Oldfield's most ambitious work to date.
OnOffOn - Surrender Now
Review by Gary Hill
This debut release from OnOffOn features song writing that covers many musical styles. In fact, if one wanted to pick a shortcoming of the work, it covers too many styles.
Ozone Quartet - Nocturne
Review by Vivian Lee
I'd been looking forward to another Ozone Quartet album since hearing their first, Fresh Blood, last March. With that album, I'd found a band whose sound embodied many of the odd time signatures, and eclectic influences of progressive rock married with fluid freeform jazz.
Ozric Tentacles - Waterfall Cities
Review by Steve Alspach
Ozric Tentacles has been at the forefront of the more ambient realm of progressive rock for about fifteen years. Their trademark "pick a key and go for it" style of musicianship allows the listener to use the imagination more than most bands allow.
Pain of Salvation - Entropia
Review by Vivian Lee
In 1984, a band named "Reality" took the Swedish music scene's attention with not just the members' young age but their musical talent as well. Since then the band has had a few personnel changes and a name change.
Alan Parsons - Project - Tales of Mystery and Imagination
Review by Steve Alspach
In keeping with the theme of this issue of MSJ (Halloween), I hearken back to something truly frightening: Hurricane Smith. In 1972 former Pink Floyd producer Norman "Hurricane" Smith released an abhorrent piece of MOR saccharine called "Oh Babe, What Would You Say."
Alan Parsons - The Time Machine
Review by Gary Hill
This album, the latest release by Alan Parsons, finds him doing the blend of prog and pop that has been his forte for many years. It is an album that has peaks and valleys, but overall is entertaining and rather substantial.
Pentwater - Out of the Abyss
Review by Gary Hill
Combining heavy helpings of Yes, Genesis and ELP with the some of the weirdness of Frank Zappa, Out of the Abyss, and Pentwater in general had some of the quirkiest and most unusual progressive rock ever created.
Philharmonie - Le Dernier Mot - The Last Word
Review by Gary Hill
Released in 1999, this disc is sort of the swan song of French group Philharmonie. It is a fine prog album, and should stand as a great monument to the band.
Simon Phillips - Another Lifetime
Review by Gary Hill
Although this album is more of a jazz album than anything else, it is included in the prog section because of Simon Phillips involvement in many assorted prog projects, most recently the ELP tribute album also reviewed this month.
Pink Floyd - Meddle
Review by Steve Alspach
This album shows how well Pink Floyd was able to make the transition from experimental band to a song-based unit without losing any sense of musical adventure.
Planet X - Universe
Review by Gary Hill
Building on styles started on the first Planet X disc, this is a strong prog outing that includes a jazzy sort of texture. This one comes across a bit more hard rocking than the previous.
Platypus - Ice Cycles
Review by Gary Hill
The second release from Platypus, this is good fun prog with a classic rock edge. At times it is Floydish, at times Dregsish, but all with this particular group's style all over it.
Platypus - When Pus Comes To Shove
Review by Gary Hill
Combining elements of many `70`s styles, including prog, in a fresh mode, When Pus Comes To Shove is a strong work that should really hold up to the test of time.
Point of Ares - Enemy Glory
Review by Gary Hill
You really will probably never hear another band that sounds like this. Taking art rock influences and a very strong literary basis, Point of Ares adds in elements typically not seen in this genre of music.
Point of Ares - Sorrows of Young Apollo
Review by Gary Hill
Point of Ares` debut showcased an unusual sound which introduced punk textures into the progressive rock landscape. This CD continues in that musical direction, but seems much more refined, showing that the band is honing their craft.
Procol Harum - BBC Live In Concert
Review by Gary Hill

Procol Harum consisted of Gary Brooker, Chris Copping, Mick Grabham, Alan Cartwright, B. J. Wilson and Keith Reid on this disc. This is a solid live recording featuring some good prog sorts of music from this classic outfit.

Qoph - Kalejkoskopiska-aktiviteter
Review by Gary Hill
Very intriguing Swedish prog, this one combines straightforward rock arrangements with more traditional prog and fusion. The result is quite entertaining.
Renaissance - Novella
Review by Steve Alspach
Renaissance was a unique band, blending a rare combination of acoustic rock and classical music into a never-duplicated result. Like many others, I was a Renaissance fan in the 70s.
Rocket Scientists - Oblivion Days
Review by Gary Hill
This is a very good album, no question about it. The disc covers a lot of musical territory and has a great prog sensibility.
Rocket4357 Project - Flower Pot Hat
Review by Gary Hill
This disc is a strong debut entry from The Rocket4357 Project. In many ways it is a competent pop/rock album, but even in that mode, the prog influences show through.
Royal Hunt - Paradox
Review by Gary Hill
Although Royal Hunt are certainly no strangers to the international music scene (they are quite popular in many countries, and this is their 5th album), they are, thus far, fairly unheard of in the United States.
Rush - A Farewell To Kings
Review by Mike Korn
It was 23 years ago when I first heard this album in its entirety. And now, many years and many journeys (musical and otherwise) later, it is still one of my most prized possessions.
Rush - Caress of Steel
Review by Gary Hill
Caress of Steel was sort of a crossroads for Rush, taking them from their more metal beginnings into the progressive directions that would characterize the next phase of their career. Much of this album is quite metallic, but with many strong prog leanings.
Rush - Different Stages
Review by Gary Hill
Due to several personal tragedies in drummer Neil Peart`s life, Rush is currently on hiatus, and their future is uncertain. This album, chronicling the Test For Echo tour (primarily), could well be the band`s last effort.
Senses - Fields Unsown
Review by Gary Hill
The music on this disc is quite strong progressive rock by an independent band that should, if there is justice, begin getting some attention soon. The music herein is quite good, although there is a slight tendency for sameness.
Derek Sherinian - Planet X
Review by Gary Hill
This one really comes as a surprise to many. Coming from such gigs as Alice Cooper`s band and Kiss, when Sherinian joined Dream Theater, he was perceived as more the rock and roll type of style, and less prog.
Spiral Architect - A Sceptic's Universe
Review by Yoni Bashan
When the band Spiral Architect comes to mind, one can only visualise intense melodic chaos or the impossible pictures of M.C Escher.
Spock's Beard - Beware of Darkness
Review by Gary Hill
The leanings on this album are widespread (Neil Young, Yes, Beatles, King Crimson), and the changes are so fast as to be difficult to keep track of at times.
Spock's Beard - Day For Night
Review by Steve Alspach

Day for Night is the fourth studio album from Spock`s Beard. The album is a departure from their earlier albums in that shorter numbers has replaced the fifteen-minute suites.

Spock's Beard - Kindness of Strangers
Review by Gary Hill

Considered by many to be one of the best of the new wave of progressive rock bands, Spock`s Beard was formed in 1992 in Los Angeles.

Spock's Beard - The Light
Review by Gary Hill

This album shows influences from many prog directions (Yes, Genesis, Alan Parsons) and nonprog directions (metal, Elton John). .

Spock's Beard - V
Review by Steve Alspach

The fifth album from Spock's Beard shows them to be at the forefront of current progressive music. In this album the band is able to play exciting, adventurous music without ever becoming self-indulgent or pompous.

Star People - ...Are Coming
Review by Gary Hill

Star People … are weird … and intriguing and fun. Did I mention weird?

Star People - Genius
Review by Gary Hill

The follow-up to Star People's …Are Coming, Genius shows the band in a lot more natural and polished form.

Starcastle - Starcastle
Review by Gary Hill
Starcastle have gotten much criticism over the years for being "a rip off of Yes". Certainly the Yes influences are very strong, but honestly they really did their own take on those influences.
Tempest - 10th Anniversary Compilation
Review by Gary Hill
The latest release from Celtic prog band Tempest, this CD is a compilation, but in an unusual way. Although these are all older Tempest songs, they are new performances of those songs.
Tempest - The Gravel Walk
Review by Gary Hill

Fans of Jethro Tull should really check this album out. This is good solid rock, in the vein of Tull, but with a more solid Celtic tradition. 

Ten Jinn - As On A Darkling Plain
Review by Gary Hill
Including an epic length number and influences ranging from Genesis to Tull and others, this album is definitely all progressive rock. The vocal arrangements on this release are one of its strongest points, but the music is not lacking in any way either.
Tiles - Presents of Mind
Review by Gary Hill

With long time Rush producer Terry Brown manning the boards on this one, and a cover designed by Hugh Syme (also well known for his association with that band), the comparisons to that Canadian trio are to be expected. Truly, this group does have some common ground as far as sound with the band. 

Transatlantic - STMPE
Review by Gary Hill and Steve Alspach
When you talk progressive rock and the term "supergroup" comes up, this band will certainly come to mind. The band is made up of Roine Stolt of Flower Kings, Pete Trewavas of Marillion, Neal Morse of Spocks Beard and Mike Portnoy of Dream Theater.
Under The Big Tree - Under the Big Tree
Review by Gary Hill
Under The Big Tree is an art rock concept album by Nick Peck and several other musicians. The album chronicles a series of visions that Peck had while in a deep trance.
Un1son - Fountains of Gold
Review by Gary Hill
Actually a test pressing, this release by Rick Neuhoff`s project UN1SON is a solid prog album, although a bit roughly mixed at times. The lyrics to the album are poem`s from Wendy Vig`s Fountains of Gold book, which is illustrated by Yes` Jon Anderson.
Van der Graaf Generator - Still Life
Review by Steve Alspach
 "At the time it seemed a reasonable course to harness all the force of life without the threat of death, but soon we found that boredom and inertia are not negatives but all the law we know, and dead are will and words like survival."
Vanden Plas - Far Off Grace
Review by Gary Hill
Although this band is heavily influenced by Dream Theater, they are definitely not a clone, as they do have their own sound.
Various Artists - All Good People (An Evening of Music From Yes Fans)
Review by Gary Hill
This disc is an interesting compilation. The only tie that binds all these musicians is that they are Yes fans who post to the AOL Yes Bulletin Board.
Various Artists - Encores, Legends and Paradoxes
Review by Gary Hill
With a cast of players that reads like a prog "who`s who", this ELP tribute takes the classics and makes them fresh and new again. The result is an incredibly listenable piece of music that really entertains.
Various Artists - Supper`s Ready
Review by Gary Hill
A tribute album devoted to the music of Genesis, Supper`s Ready is a strong work. The renditions here stay more true to the original performances than on some similar albums, but this does not take away from the relevance of the CD.
Various Artists - Tales From Yesterday
Review by Gary Hill
A tribute to the music of Yes, Tales From Yesterday, features some very fine renditions of Yessongs performed by a variety of artists (including several past and present members of Yes). This is a mixed bag. Some of the tracks are quite faithful to the original, while others represent major reworkings.
Various Artists - The Show That Never Ends
Review by Gary Hill

This album is a compilation of various progressive rock performances that were presented on the King Biscuit Flower Hour radio show. All of the outings are quite good, and the selection of artists is also. 

Von Zamla - 1983
Review by Gary Hill

A compilation of live performances from 1983, this disc is a great prog jam type of album with definite King Crimson leanings. It is also very jazz oriented, and has some considerably strong material on it.

Rick Wakeman - Return To The Centre of The Earth
Review by Gary Hill
By going back to his past, Rick Wakeman has created an album that is nearly a masterpiece. A sequel to his Journey to the Centre of the Earth disc, Return to the Centre of the Earth is a very potent progressive rock concept album.
Steve Walsh - Glossolalia
Review by Gary Hill
One of the more recognizable voices in '70's rock, Steve Walsh is both the most well-known voice of Kansas and their keyboardist. He is joined on this solo release by Trent Gardner (Explorer's Club), Virgil Donati (Planet X), Page Waldron, Jim Roberts, Mike Slamer and Billy Greer.
Wappa Gappa - A Myth
Review by Gary Hill
In much the same vein as their first album, this disc is solid prog. The Japanese lyrics leave a bit to be desired by Western standards, but the music certainly makes up for this.
Wappa Gappa - Yamatai
Review by Gary Hill
Featuring strong prog arrangements and vocals in Japanese, this is a competent release that should entertain most prog fans.
Jeff Wayne - Jeff Wayne’s Musical Version of The War of the Worlds
Review by Gary Hill
This album is a rock opera based on the classic H. G. Wells book War of the Worlds. It is a very theatric work, somewhat more musical theater than rock album.
Ron Wright - Acoustic Dreams
Review by Gary Hill
This is an entertaining instrumental (with one exception) album featuring strong guitar-based compositions and competent musicianship. At times, Wright`s work calls to mind such people as Steve Howe.
Rick Wright - Broken China
Review by Gary Hill
For Pink Floyd afficianados, this disc is a must have. Wright`s writing style, in the moody sort of Floyd mode, makes it quite obvious what band he is from.
Yes - Friends and Relatives
Review by Gary Hill
Friends and Relatives is a two CD set that is a compilation of two Yes tracks from the KTA albums with solo works from the various artists. Other than the two stellar group performances, the Rick Wakeman pieces and Steve Howe`s take on Tales From Topographic Oceans stand out the most.
Yes - Going For The One
Review by Gary Hill
Being an album that had Rick Wakeman rejoining the fold, this one was looked upon as a very strong and welcome release to Yes fans. Indeed, it still ranks among the favorites of many of them.
Yes - House of Yes-Live From The House of Blues
Review by Gary Hill
This two-disc set is the companion soundtrack to the new DVD of this live show recorded on Yes' The Ladder tour. There are a lot of really good performances here, but also a few complaints.
Yes - Keys To Ascension
Review by Gary Hill
The majority of this 2 disc set is a series of live recordings from the three SLO concerts that Yes did in 1996. The live material is augmented by two new studio cuts.
Yes - Keys to Ascension 2
Review by Gary Hill
Keys to Ascension 2 contains live tracks from the San Luis Obispo concerts, recorded March of 1996(disc one), and 5 new studio songs(disc two). The lineup for the album is Jon Anderson, Steve Howe, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman and Alan White.
Yes - Open Your Eyes
Review by Gary Hill
Yes fans are pretty well divided on this album, many find it to be a sell out of Yes` musical principles, while many others find it good, but not great. There are still others who find it to be a very fine effort.
Yes - Open Your Eyes (Surround Sound Version)
Review by Gary Hill
This is in many ways a reprint of my earlier review of Open Your Eyes. As reviewed here, it does, however, reflect the changes made when the CD was remastered as the first album ever mixed for Surround Sound systems.
Yes - Something`s Coming
Review by Gary Hill
This album is actually a compilation of Yes performances on various television and radio programs from the 1969-1970 era. The personnel on this album are Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Peter Banks, Bill Bruford and Tony Kaye.
Yes - The Ladder
Review by Gary Hill
For some bands, the music industry seems to cause a paradox. In order to survive as an artist, one must have a certain degree of commercial success, but to the hardcore fans, doing so can bring forth cries of "too poppy".
Yes - Tormato
Review by Gary Hill

An album that is rather maligned in fan circles, Tormato is a bit pop oriented, but really has some wonderous moments.

Yes - Yessongs
Review by Gary Hill
At the time that Yessongs was released, the critics were calling Yes a studio phenomenon, and saying that they could not reproduce their complex arrangements live. This release, at least partially, was meant to dispel that rumour -- and it worked.
Metal/Prog Metal CD Reviews
Angel Witch - Resurrection
Review by Mike Korn
Just how many albums are there called “Resurrection”? I've already got Halford's “Resurrection” as well as Venom's. Are Milli Vanilli going to be coming out with a “Resurrection” album soon?
Autumn Rest - Poems From the Fire
Review by Gary Hill
Autumn Rest is Chad Belteau, Kevin Belteau, and Joey Landry. This release combines very diverse elements, being the first release that I have heard that mixes progressive rock themes with the stylings of such performers as Nine Inch Nails. This album is certainly not for every progressive rock fan, but for the more adventurous, (who are looking for something new), it should be a pleasant change of pace.
Sebastian Bach - Bring 'Em Bach Alive
Review by Brian Angotti
From Skid Row to solo man, Mr. Bach does the transition with great ease. The first new music from Sebastian in years provides the same flair that was once Skid Row. Bring 'em Bach Alive, rightfully titled, is a combination of classic Skid songs mixed with the new.
Black Sabbath - Black Sabbath
Review by Gary Hill
Released in 1969 in the last days of the hippie era, Black Sabbath`s debut had definite roots in what had come before, but was a major change in tone.
Black Sabbath - Never Say Die
Review by Gary Hill
Black Sabbath were arguably the creators of the heavy metal genre, but were never really happy to rest on their laurels for that accomplishment. They generally have pushed the envelope in many ways touching on musical styles which most metal bands consider out of their realm.
Black Sabbath - Reunion
Review by Gary Hill
Reunion represents the first performance of all the original members of Black Sabbath as a unit since 1979. The album is a two-disc set that consists of concert recordings from December of 1987 teamed with two new studio cuts. The band is back in all its glory.
Black Sabbath - Technical Ecstasy
Review by Gary Hill
A controversial album for Black Sabbath, this disc found them stretching into new and untried directions. The trademarked Sab metal is still present, but it is joined by other diverse sounds.
Blind Guardian - Nightfall in Middle-Earth
Review by Mike Korn

I've heard a lot about the German progressive power metal band Blind Guardian over the years but I've never actually laid ears on this semi-legendary group until now. Thanks go out to Century Media Records for finally making these guys and their records domestically available at prices you can actually afford.

Candlemass - Ancient Dreams
Review by Gary Hill
Not extremely progish, this one does have a few moments of prog leanings. I considered those leanings enough to include the band in the prog metal category.
DC Cooper - DC Cooper
Review by Gary Hill
The first solo album by former Royal Hunt vocalist D. C. Cooper, this is quite a strong release. Some of the material on here could easily have been done by his former band, but Cooper also brings in some more `80`s tinged metal influences.
Crimson Glory - Astronomica
Review by Gary Hill
With far reaching influences (King Diamond, Judas Priest, Queensryche, Rush, Iron Maiden, Rob Zombie, Powerman 5000 and even Alice Cooper), this CD really puts an intriguing twist on the metal genre.
Dali's Dilemma - Manifesto For Futurism
Review by Gary Hill
Dali`s Dilemma is a new prog metal band on the Magna Carta label. The major influences to this reviewer are Queensryche and Dream Theater, but there are other leanings as well.
Danger Danger - The Return of The Gildersleeves
Review by Brian Angotti
The second installment of the Where Are They Now Files comes from Danger Danger. This band has released three albums with new vocalist Paul Laine. The Return of The Gildersleeves is a brilliant piece of work from a very underrated band.
Danzig - 6:66 Satan's Child
Review by Steve Colombo
Danzig's new album, 6:66 Satan's Child, is excellent. Danzig just keeps on getting better and better with each successive album.
The Deadlights - The Deadlights
Review by Gary Hill
This album certainly fits into the hard rock/metal vein. However, it is not limited by a single style or format. Indeed many of the songs come from varying schools of metal and one cut in particular really doesn't fit as metal at all.
Digital Ruin - Dwelling In The Out
Review by Gary Hill
With many CD's the question comes up, is this prog or prog metal. Some are really easy to define, others not so simple. This one falls into that second category. 
Divine Regale - Ocean Mind
Review by Gary Hill
Combining elements of general progressive rock (influenced by bands like Yes), Queensryche (the vocals being the largest Queensryche influence present) and even Iron Maiden, this is a very well conceived, and mature performance.
Doro - Calling the Wild
Review by Gary Hill
In the 1980’s Doro Pesch fronted the German metal band Warlock. That band is no more, but Doro has kept her career and love of metal alive through the years. This new disc is her first release in the US in many years, but she has continued releasing albums in Europe the entire time.
Double Drive - 1000 Yard Stare
Review by Gary Hill
With the over abundance of rock bands these days it is good to hear something fresh. Doubledrive's debut album is a diverse rock explosion, aggressive and yet still melodic.
Engine - Engine
Review by Vivian Lee
Fates Warning vocalist Ray Alder decided to use the interim between albums to cut his first solo release entitled Engine. Alder had to look no further than Fates Warning's most recent touring lineup.
Faith No More - The Real Thing
Review by Gary Hill
Although the majority of the lyrics to this album are too dark and gritty for my tastes, the music contained herein is a very good meshing of heavy metal and progressive rock influences.
Fates Warning - Disconnected
Review by Vivian Lee
In July of 2000 Fates Warning, the thinking person's prog metal band from California, have offered their latest, Disconnected. This brave new effort resembles, but not rehashes, past works like A Pleasant Shade of Grey or Parallels, either musically or in theme.
Fates Warning - Parallels
Review by Gary Hill
Fates Warning is Roy Alder, Jim Matheos, Frank Aresti, Joe Dibiase and Mark Zander. Dream Theater`s James Labrie provides background vocals on Life in Still Water.
Fight - A Small Deadly Space
Review by Gary Hill
Much of this album is pure metal, however there are sections that show much progressive influences. Rob Halford`s vocal work here is based in the lower end of the register, rather than showing the high end pyrotechnics that he exhibited in Judas Priest.
FireHouse - Bring 'Em Out Live
Review by Brian Angotti
Since scorching up the charts up with hits like "Love Of A Lifetime" and "Don't Treat Me Bad", Firehouse have finally put on tape what they do best; and that is play live. Bring 'em Out "LIVE" is a collection of the band's greatest hits captured live.
Godsmack - Awake
Review by Gary Hill
There is a term in the music biz called "sophomore jinx". It refers to the phenomenon of bands with very strong debut efforts having a hard time matching the quality of that first release on the follow-up.
Godsmack - Godsmack
Review by Gary Hill
Arguably, this album is one of the best hard rock/metallic albums of the last couple years. The songs are all very strong, without exception.
Hair of The Dog - Rise
Review by Gary Hill
If you like your rock hard and fun, then this is definitely the album for you. The disc really has a nice '80's metal texture to it, and I say that in a good way.
Halford - Resurrection
Review by Gary Hill
The god of metal has returned! Rob Halford has come back to the metal fold, and if this first release is any indication, it should be a powerful and successful return.
Helloween - Keeper of the Seven Keys Part II
Review by Gary Hill
Dating from 1988, this is early prog metal, and in many ways is more pure metal than prog metal. However, it does contain progish elements. The musicians on the album are Kai Hansen, Michael Weikath, Markus Grosskopf, Ingo Schwichenburg and Michael Kiske.
Hypocrisy - Into The Abyss
Review by Mike Korn
In 1992, a virtually unknown Swedish death metal band named "Hypocrisy" debuted with their initial effort, "Penetralia".
Iommi - Iommi
Review by Gary Hill
This solo release by Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi has quite a bit in common with last year’s Supernatural release by Santana. In both cases you have a guitar legend, who is an almost undisputed originator of his musical genre.
Iron Maiden - Brave New World
Review by Brian Angotti
Iron Maiden is back and stronger than ever. With the return of Bruce Dickinson the band is launching the best CD of their careers, Brave New World.
Judas Priest - 98 Live Meltdown
Review by Gary Hill
Containing live versions of Priest songs both classic and some more obscure, this disc is a very good representation of a live Priest show. Some of the cuts seem to suffer a little from the absence of Rob Halford.
Judas Priest - Sad Wings of Destiny
Review by Gary Hill
Few would call Judas Priest a progressive metal band. Certainly the bulk of their career has been devoted to pure metal.
King Diamond - Abigail
Review by Gary Hill
No one writes scary concept albums like King Diamond - no one. This disc is one of the spookiest lyrical excursions you will ever encounter.
LA Guns - Greatest Hits and Black Beauties
Review by Brian Angotti
With a brief and dissatisfying run with Jizzy Pearl of Love/Hate fame on lead and a revolving door of band members, L.A. Guns return with Greatest Hits and Black Beauties. The disc is a compilation of new tracks and re-recorded classic hits from the original band.
Lowbrow - Victims at Play
Review by Mike Korn
Well, you know you're not going to get thought-provoking progressive music with technical virtuosity from a band called "Lowbrow".
Marilyn Manson - Antichrist Superstar
Review by Gary Hill
Marilyn Manson is very controversial, but if you really take the time to listen to the music, there is a dark beauty and charm to it.
Mötley Crüe - Live Entertainment or Death
Review by Brian Angotti and Gary Hill
The fans have asked for it for years and the Crue gives them Entertainment or Death. Entertainment or Death is Motley Crue's first live album since exploding on the L.A. scene nearly twenty years earlier.
Mötley Crüe - New Tattoo
Review by Brian Angotti

Motley Crüe, the bad boys of rock, return and ink us with New Tattoo! There may be a new Crüe for the new millennium, but not a new sound.

Mötley Crüe - Shout At The Devil
Review by Gary Hill
Motley Crue somewhat defined an era of heavy metal, and this landmark album was the beginning of that influence by them.
Motörhead - We Are Motörhead
Review by Mike Korn
Motörhead is a band I've enjoyed and respected for over 20 years. They have never compromised on their raw blues-soaked heavy metal.
New Sun - Fractured
Review by Gary Hill
This album combines strong prog metal leanings in the traditions of Queensryche and others with more standard progressive rock influences from such bands as Yes, Rush, Kansas and King Crimson.
Pain of Salvation - One Hour By The Concrete Lake
Review by Gary Hill
Although this band seems to walk very closely between the line of prog and prog metal, this reviewer feels that the foot lands on the side of progressive rock.
Ian Parry - Ian Parry's Consortium Project
Review by Brian Angotti
Ian Parry's Consortium Project is a new breed of rock for the new year. This album is a blend of powerful high-energy vocals and heavy guitar riffs.
Poison - Crack a Smile and More
Review by Brian Angotti
Are the eighties back for more? Well, with the recent success Poison has had it is very likely.
Poison - Power To The People
Review by Brian Angotti
Nearly ten years later. The original line up of Poison returns with "Power To The People". Power To The People features five new tracks and classic Poison tunes recorded live on their 2000 reunion tour.
Puya - Fundamental
Review by Gary Hill
This one is included as progressive metal, because although it really doesn`t fit the traditional definition of that genre, it includes very unique musical influences and quirky arrangements.
Queensrÿche - Operation Mindcrime
Review by Gary Hill
This album is a definite masterpiece, and certainly (thus far) the peak of Queensryche`s career artistically. Although definitely a heavy metal album, in many ways Operation Mindcrime is so much more than that.
Queensrÿche - Rage For Order
Review by Gary Hill
Rage for Order, the album directly preceding Operation Mindcrime, certainly shows the potential and directions in which Queensryche was ready to move. Although showing elements of other bands and styles, this album is a very unique and innovative work that foreshadows the stylistic directions that the band were getting ready to undertake.
Rhapsody - Dawn of Victory
Review by Mike Korn
By the bristling beard of Odin, what manner of mortals be these? The members of the Italian power metal band Rhapsody have taken the fantasy theme to new...and often ridiculous...heights.
Royal Hunt - Double Live In Japan
Review by Gary Hill
Doing a wonderful job of combining classical music with heavy metal, Royal Hunt's albums have always sounded like studio-only productions. It seemed like a lot would be lost in the translation to live performance.
Royal Hunt - Moving Target
Review by Gary Hill

Much of this album represents a nearly perfect synthesis of classical music and heavy metal. In many places, the two styles are so intertwined as to be inseparable.

Saxon - Metalhead
Review by Mike Korn
I can attest personally to the fact that Saxon is one of the best live heavy metal bands on the planet, having just seen them demolish The Attic with UDO in tow. These dudes have been plying their trade for many years and never have they wavered from their desire to provide pure, unadulterated metal.
Shadow Gallery - Tyranny
Review by Gary Hill
This progressive metal CD, the third from the band, is a concept album that tells a tale which could certainly make a fine film. The music here is well written and performed.
Stratovarius - Destiny
Review by Gary Hill
A sub-segment of prog metal seems to seek to merge classical and metal styles into one format. Among the bands that work in that genre, Stratovarius and Royal Hunt seem to be the best.
Glenn Tipton - Baptizm of Fire
Review by Gary Hill
This first solo album by Judas Priest guitarist Glenn Tipton is a fine piece of work. It takes the Priest sounds one expects to find here and updates them, bringing new angles and directions to them.
Union - The Blue Room
Review by Brian Angotti
The Blue Room, the follow up album from Union, is an exceptional piece of work. This album shows the growth and maturity in the band, both musically and lyrically.
Various Artists - Progressive DisDURPance
Review by Gary Hill
This sampler of German progmetal and prog bands is produced and released by a webpage that focuses on such bands. The website is Die Ultimate Review Page,www.durp.com .
Venom - Resurrection
Review by Mike Korn
Not many bands can say they started a whole sub-genre of music but Venom is one. Almost 20 years ago, they were the darkest and heaviest metal band ever.
Victor - Victor
Review by Vivian Lee
In 1994, Rush guitarist decided to use the interim between albums and a tour to record his first solo, Victor. Invited guests include I Mother Earth's Edwin, Canadian singer/songwriter Dalbello, bassist Les Claypool, guitarist Bill Bell and drummer Blake Manning.
Non-Prog CD Reviews
ABC - Absolutely
Review by Gary Hill
ABC's blend of danceable pop really took over MTV for a year or two in the `80`s. This album is a compilation of many of their hits, some of them from that time period.
Tori Amos - Boys For Pele
Review by Gary Hill
This album is yet another wonderful work from Tori Amos. Her style combines wonderful lyrics, that are at times a bit on the gritty side, with music that calls to mind Kate Bush, without copying her.
Tori Amos - From the Choirgirl Hotel
Review by Gary Hill
It seems that every album that Tori Amos does is better than the previous release. Considering the quality of her albums, this has to be a difficult task.
Black 47 - Fire of Freedom
Review by Gary Hill
This disc is a fine combination of many varied musical styles. There is a definite Irish bent that is always present on the album (sometimes in the music, sometimes the vocals, sometimes the lyrics, sometimes all of them).
Black 47 - Live In New York City
Review by Gary Hill
A document of a live show of this intriguing band, this is a fun album. Black 47 combines Irish sensibilities, instrumentation and lyrical content with jazzy horn sections and punk, rock and reggae musical styles into a very entertaining stew of musical entertainment.
Bliss - Chasing the Mad Rabbit
Review by Gary Hill
F eaturing some of the best song writing I have heard in a long time, this is a very strong and entertaining release. There was a solid temptation to include this album in the progressive rock section because many of the cuts have very strong prog leanings, but the influences here are so varied, non-prog seems to fit better.
Blondie - Live
Review by Gary Hill
Upon listening to this disc a question comes to mind. As good as this album is, why is this the first live album this band has released?
Blondie - No Exit
Review by Gary Hill
For fans of the classic Blondie sound, this album is certainly a welcome return. The band seems to have stayed faithful to their old sound, while updating it.
Blue Öyster Cult - Extraterrestrial Live
Review by Gary Hill
Released in 1982, this album is a very solid chronicle of a BOC live during the height of their career. Combining prog elements with accessible hooks and potent metal, this album definitely qualifies as prog metal.
Blue Öyster Cult - Heaven Forbid
Review by Gary Hill
Although the cover art leaves a bit to be desired, Heaven Forbid can certainly be looked on as a rebirth for BOC. This album seems to take the best of old BOC and bring up to date, while still staying true to those original concepts.
Blue Öyster Cult - The Revolution By Night
Review by Gary Hill
Released in October of 1983, Revolution by Night was the 12th album by Blue Oyster Cult. The music on the album is definitely in the hard rock/heavy metal sort of genre, while showing many indications of more progressive leanings, both in writing and arranging.
Blue Öyster Cult - Workshop of the Telescopes
Review by Gary Hill
This two disc compilation covers the majority of the band`s career, and hits upon many of their styles. From time to time, the music leans to metal, prog-metal, pop and hard rock.
Bodragaz - Bodragaz
Review by Gary Hill
Although the production on this disc is a bit flat at times, it is quite a listenable and entertaining release. The music here has prog leanings, but is more in a classic rock format.
Bodragaz - Somewhere In Switzerland
Review by Gary Hill
The second album from Colorado`s Bodragaz, this release continues their musical mode focusing on the `70`s classic rock sound. This band is quite accomplished at that sound, and incorporating occasional progish leanings into it.
Brain Surgeons - Malpractice
Review by Gary Hill

Brain Surgeons is former BOC member Albert Bouchard`s band. The group utilizes elements of Blue Oyster Cult in new and unusual ways.

Brain Surgeons - Piece of Work
Review by Gary Hill
This album really seems to show that this band is not content to be working in one particular style. Indeed, the styles on this double disc release range from jazzy barbershop singing to hard rock to ballads to progish material
Camper Van Beethoven - Key Lime Pie
Review by Gary Hill
Ethnic, alternative and art rock styles are combined on this album to create a very intriguing soundscape. The vocal work on the album is in a style which seems like a marriage of David Byrne and Fred Schneider vocal styles
Captain Beyond - Captain Beyond
Review by Gary Hill
This 1972 release was the first of three albums by Captain Beyond, who was at the time Rod Evans (formerly of Deep Purple), Bobby Caldwell (who had played with Johnny Winter, among others), Rhino (Larry Rhinehart from Iron Butterfly), and Lee Dorman (also from Iron Butterfly) with several backing musicians. This one almost qualifies as progressive rock.
Cheap Trick - At Budokan-The Complete Concert
Review by Gary Hill
This disc is the classic Cheap Trick album At Budokan with several tracks added to make it both representative of the whole performance and a two CD set. It is safe to say that Cheap Trick both defined and transcended the power pop genre. They combined (and continue to) catchy melodies, metallic leanings,
Concrete Blonde - Bloodletting
Review by Gary Hill
This album is a very nice work, featuring many musical themes and textures. Although not all of the album`s lyrics fit the Halloween mode, the title track is firmly rooted there, and much of the music has tones that work well.
Alice Cooper - A Fistful of Alice
Review by Gary Hill
It has been said that this release is redundant because hard-core Alice Cooper fans already have a solid live album in The Alice Cooper Show. However, I find that this release is a a considerably better recording, and that the performance presented herein is superior to that one.
Alice Cooper - Brutal Planet
Review by Gary Hill
Quite probably Alice's strongest release in years, and possibly one of the best ever, this disc is a concept album that musically seems to take the classic Alice sound and bring it up to date with a hard (even brutal) edge. The album really seems to fully integrate those two types of sounds, which is something that he seems to have been struggling with in recent years.
Alice Cooper - Hey Stoopid
Review by Gary Hill

This album showcases a metal perpective on the classic Cooper sound and also shows prog tendencies in several places. Alice is joined on this album by many musicians, including several very notables guests (Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Ozzy Osbourne and others).

Alice Cooper - The Last Temptation
Review by Gary Hill
This album is show biz from Cooper. It really feels like much of the high entertainment of `70`s era Cooper, while bringing a new intensity and power to them. This one has plenty of spooky moments along with humor.
Alice Cooper - Welcome to My Nightmare
Review by Gary Hill
To many this classic album represents Alice Cooper at his theatric best. It is a loosely knit concept album that at times is a bit weak, at times a bit over the top, but in many ways a spooky masterpiece.
Cracker - Garage D'Or
Review by Gary Hill
One of the bands that emerged when the great Camper Van Beethoven broke up, Cracker has always been an intriguing band that merges a poppy sort of mentality with a great alternative take on retro sounds. They are perhaps similar to what REM might be if Stipe and company didn't take themselves so seriously.
The Darkest of the Hillside Thickets - Cthulhu Strikes Back
Review by Gary Hill
Combining punk and metal elements with tongue in cheek lyrics, most of them based on the works of horror writer H. P. Lovecraft (1890-1937), this album is very fun, and actually rather spooky at times.
Dr. Hadley - Premium Sound System
Review by Gary Hill
This album features strong alternative sounds with many diverse influences. Premium Sound System is a very listenable CD.
The Drovers - Little High Sky Show
Review by Gary Hill
 This Chicago band, formed in 1988, is a nice combination of Celtic rock, progressive rock, and deadhead music. The personnel on this 1995 album are Paul Bradley, Sean Cleland, David Callahan, and Mike Kirkpatrick with several backing musicians.
Enuff Z'nuff - Paraphenalia
Review by Gary Hill
Showcasing potent pop/rock sensibilities and Beatles influences throughout, this is a very strong showing from this band. Its catchy melodies and intriguing arrangements should please most rock music fans.
Garbage - Garbage
Review by Gary Hill
This debut from the alternative band Garbage is a very strong effort. The disc showcases solid song writing with offbeat overtones and Shirley Manson`s wonderful vocals (which are, at times, quite haunting).
The Grateful Dead - The Reckoning
Review by Gary Hill
The Grateful Dead were always at least three different bands stylistically. There was "the rock band", "the folk band with country leanings" and "the psychedelic space rock band".
Harmony Riley - Time
Review by Gary Hill
Two points need to be made right at the beginning of this review. First, just because this band features Rick Nielsen`s sons Daxx and Miles, don`t expect them to sound like Cheap Trick, because they don`t.
Jimi Hendrix - Band of Gypsies
Review by Steve Colombo
Band of Gypsies is more than a classic album. It is a moment in time when the world of music changed forever.
King Prawn - Surrender to the Blender
Review by Gary Hill
This CD is very intriguing. The styles that this band blends together make for a very unusual mix.
Kiss - Music From The Elder
Review by Gary Hill
When it was recorded in 1981, this album was to have been a masterwork of epic proportions. A concept album with serious prog leanings, early preview copies of the album received poor reviews.
Kiss - Psycho Circus
Review by Gary Hill
The first studio album from the reunited classic Kiss lineup, Psycho Circus is a respectable and entertaining release that seems to strive to combine the older Kiss sound with newer leanings.
Laidlaw - First Big Picnic
Review by Brian Angotti
Laidlaw is the first band to emerge from Nikki Sixx's Americoma label. First Big Picnic, Laidlaw's debut is a great southern rock album with soulful vocals and blistering guitars.
Madonna - Ray of Light
Review by Gary Hill
In the interview that appeared on this site last month (see the interview archives - or check out the audio of that interview in the members area), Dave Brock mentioned the title track to this album as being space rock, so I decided to run this review.
Andrew McCutcheon - Out of the Lion`s Mouth
Review by Gary Hill
This CD is the debut for both McCutcheon as a solo artist and Plum Meat as a label. It is a very pleasing EP that combines varied `60`s influences with modern leanings
Andrew McCutcheon - Second Sun
Review by Gary Hill
On this, his second CD, McCutcheon shows a different side of himself musically. Still firmly rooted in the sounds of the `60`s and `70`s, this release seems to take on more modern alternative sounds as well.
Kenny McGee - Kenny McGee
Review by Brian Angotti
From the "where are they now files" we find Kenny McGee, a soulful vocalist and the mastermind behind the band Julliet.
Michael Medley - Christmas Piano-We Three...
Review by Gary Hill
 Michael Medley (who although not a household name, has done 5 recordings, including a live video) released this CD of solo piano Christmas songs several years ago.
The Mollys - Hat Trick
Review by Gary Hill
The description "Irish stew spiced with jalapenos"(No Depression No. 3 Jan/Feb 1998) has been applied to this band, and it seems to fit quite well. T
Money For The Toll - Do`s Cup Of Tea
Review by Gary Hill
This release is a live recording of the band Money For The Toll. The music on this album is hard-edged rock with solid prog elements.
My Ruin - Speak and Destroy
Review by Gary Hill
My Ruin is Tairrie B.'s newest project. Tairrie got her start as a rapper and went on to be in bands Manhole and Tura Satana. She is joined on this project by a host of musicians.
Nazareth - Boogaloo
Review by Gary Hill
In the `70`s Nazareth were one of the premier bands in the field of fun, solid rock and roll music. As time wore on, they seemed to struggle in trying to redefine their sound.
New American Shame - New American Shame
Review by Brian Angotti
Just when you thought party rock was dead, New American Shame emerges from the grunge capital, Seattle.
No Doubt - No Doubt
Review by Gary Hill
Although a lot of the material on this disc stays in one area (ska), the band, and album, is far from a one trick pony.
Orgy - Vapor Transmission
Review by Brian Angotti
Just when you thought Orgy was going to be one hit wonders, the band drops a killer album. Vapor Transmission is the second effort from the gender-bending band Orgy.
Page and Plant - Walking into Clarksdale
Review by Gary Hill
This second album from Led Zeppelin partners Jimmy Page and Robert Plant holds onto elements of their first reunion album (No Quarter), but in many ways really feels like the return of Led Zeppelin.
Bob Rivers & Twisted Radio - I Am Santa Claus
Review by Gary Hill
The back cover of this CD contains the following admonition. “If you’re looking for the true meaning of Christmas, buy this album. Then, by all means, keep looking.”
RockBitch - Motor Driven Bimbo
Review by Gary Hill
Reading a bit of background about this band, it would be easy to see them as a gimmick band of the highest order. Indeed, here you have an almost exclusively female band, who perform mostly in the nude.
Savage Garden - Savage Garden
Review by Gary Hill
Several backing musicians join this Australian duo (Darren Hayes and Daniel Jones) on this album. R & B/Dance music has never been a style to which I have been drawn.
Skunk Anansie - Post Orgasmic Chill
Review by Gary Hill
Combining hard rock elements with pop, space rock, and punk layers, this album shows a very versatile and talented band that will not be tied to one musical style. All the musicians put in strong performances, but Skin`s vocals often steal the show. 
Smashmouth - Fush Yu Mang
Review by Gary Hill
While this album is certainly not a progressive rock album, it contains one aspect common to much progressive rock, the melding of varied musical styles into one coherent work.
Supertramp - Some Things Never Change
Review by Gary Hill
Although Roger Hodgson is no longer in the band, this album certainly proves that Supertramp can work their particular form of magic without him. One really does not miss Hodgson on this disc.
TagYerit - Heavy Construction
Review by Gary Hill

This album is a wonderfully entertaining piece of work. Essentially, the entire disc is catchy pop tunes, but all of them are done in a very left of field manner.

TagYerit - Tubeman
Review by Gary Hill
The second album by Tag Yerit, this one is a bit less humorous than the last one. It still has some definite funny stuff, though, and carries on with the musical themes of the band; sort of a quirky combo of sounds as diverse as '60's and '50's rock, The B-52's and Blondie.
UFO - Covenant
Review by Gary Hill
The newest release by hard rock favorites UFO is actually a two-disc set. The first disc consists of new material while disc two is a live album.
UFO - Walk On Water
Review by Gary Hill
This album is a very strong reunion for the quintessential lineup of this classic hard rock/metal band who have always taken that genre in a more art rock directions. This album is really one of the stronger albums this band has ever done, and if there is any justice in the world, will take them to new heights.
Uriah Heep - Sonic Origami
Review by Gary Hill
It seemed that for a time Uriah Heep was running away from what they did best. In the `70`s, Heep music was characterized by progish arrangements on hard rock numbers with incredible keyboard sounds and vocal arrangements to die for.
Various Artists - Inhale
Review by Gary Hill
Billed as a collection of “stoner rock”, this disc has a hard edged texture that is at once modern, while still having a classic rock feel to it. As with most various artists collections, it has its high points and its low points.
Various Artists - Rock N Roll Christmas
Review by Gary Hill
f you are looking for a CD that combines solid rock with Christmas themes to augment your holiday festivities, this is a good choice.
Various Artists - Stairways to Heaven
Review by Gary Hill
Stairways to Heaven is one of the wackiest albums ever released. Every song on here is Stairway to Heaven, but all performed in very different styles.
Various Artists - The Coolest Christmas
Review by Gary Hill
This disc, as many various artists compilations, is a mixed bag. Some of the cuts here are very good, while others are forgettable, and many fall somewhere in between.
Various Artists - The Craft Motion Picture Soundtrack
Review by Gary Hill
This album is really a very good work, even taken out of the context of the film. The music here is fresh, and sets an interesting tone.
Westworld - Westworld
Review by Brian Angotti
Westworld started out as a side project, but has quickly become a highly acclaimed musical act. Westworld's debut album, simply titled Westworld, is a great new rock-n-roll album for the new millennium.
White Witch - A Spiritual Greeting
Review by Gary Hill
Released in the early `70`s this album has recently been reissued on CD. Long a cult classic band, White Witch combined hard rock with prog elements and a sense of mystery.
White Witch - White Witch
Review by Gary Hill
The debut album from this southern band, this one showed very strong prog leanings, and really, with a few exceptions, holds up well even after this much time.
Wooster Sang - Wooster Sang
Review by Gary Hill
In a mode that is both modern and nostalgic this is a very good rock album. At times various influences show through, most notably Lenny Kravitz and The Black Crowes, but in many ways, Wooster Sang has their own particular flavor.
The X Brothers - Solid Citizens
Review by Gary Hill
Featuring Blue Oyster Cult`s Joe Bouchard, it is no wonder that much of this album has BOC tendencies. This is a very solid rock disc that occasionally rises to the point of greatness.
The Zen Tricksters - A Love Surreal
Review by Gary Hill

Picture a Grateful Dead that is a bit more tight and a lot more jazz oriented, and you have the Zen Tricksters. The vocals and music on this disc is very much in the mode of The Grateful Dead, but with a very precise approach and a lot of jazz oriented instrumental breaks.

DVD/Video Reviews
Dream Theater - 5 Years In A Livetime (Video)
Review by G. W. Hill
 This video, the companion to the Once In A Livetime CD, chronicles the recent history of the band through assorted video clips.
Interviews
Ajalon
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Ajalon`s Randy George from 1998
Annihilator
Interview by Arnold Hablewitz
Interview With Annihilator`s Jeff Waters from 2000
Sebastian Bach
Interview by Brian Angotti
Interview with Sebastian Bach from 2000


Robert Berry
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Robert Berry from 1998
Blue Öyster Cult
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Buck Dharma and Eric Bloom of Blue Oyster Cult from 1998
Boetz
Interview by Mike Korn
Interview With Boetz' Ernie Boetz from 2000
Brain Surgeons
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Brain Surgeons' Deborah Frost
Brain Surgeons
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Brain Surgeons' Albert Bouchard
Cairo (USA)
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Mark Robertson of Cairo From 1998
DC Cooper
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With DC Cooper from 2000
Dali's Dilemma
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Dali`s Dilemma from 1999
Dangerous Odds
Interview by Vivian Lee
Interview with Art Durkee of Dangerous Odds from 2000


The Deadlights
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Duke of The Deadlights from 2000
Dio
Interview by Mike Korn
Interview with Ronnie James Dio from 2000
Djam Karet
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Gayle Ellett of Djam Karet from 2000


Doro
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Doro from 2000
Enuff Z'nuff
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Chip Z'Nuff from 1999
Fish
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Fish from 1999
Godsmack
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Godsmack`s Tony from 1999


Trey Gunn
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Trey Gunn from 2000
Hawkwind
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Dave Brock from 1998
Audio of this Interview is available in our members' area
Steve Hogarth
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Steve Hogarth from 1998
Lands End
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Mark Lavallee from 1999
Tony Levin
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Tony Levin From 1998
Audio of this interview is available in our members area.
Magellan
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Magellan's Trent Gardner from 1999

Audio of this interview is in our members area
Frank Marino
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Frank Marino From 2000
Neal Morse
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Neal Morse From 1999
Audio of this Interview is In Our Members Area - along with the full text
Nektar
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Derek Moore of Nektar from 2000
Niacin
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Niacin's John Novello From 2000
Gary Numan
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Gary Numan From 2000
Opeth
Interview by Mike Korn
Interview with Opeth's Mikael Akerfeldt from 2000
John Petrucci
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with John Petrucci From 2000
Point of Ares
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Karen Michalson of Point Of Ares From 2000
Mike Portnoy
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Mike Portnoy From 1998
RockBitch
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Babe of Rockbitch From 2000
Rocket4357 Project
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Greg Lounsberry of Rocket 4357 Project From 1998
Jordan Rudess
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Jordan Rudess From 1999
Jason Schmidt
Interview by Vivian Lee
Interview With Jason Schmidt From 2000


Jeremy Shaw
Interview by Vivian Lee
Interview With Ozone Quartet`s Jeremy Shaw From 2000
Billy Sheehan
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Billy Sheehan From 2000


Derek Sherinian
Interview by Gary Hill
Q & A with Derek Sherinian From 1998
Derek Sherinian
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Derek Sherinian From 1998
Derek Sherinian
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Derek Sherinian From 1999
Skunk Anansie
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Skin and Mark of Skunk Anansie From 1999
Star People
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Star People`s Ambassador Randy From 2000

Audio of this interview is available in our members area.
Tempest
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Lief Sorbye of Tempest from 1998
Union
Interview by Brian Angotti
Interview with John Corabi of Union From 2000


Uriah Heep
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Bernie Shaw From 2000
Audio of this interview is contained in our members area
Yes
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Yes' Billy Sherwood from 1999


Yes
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Alan White of Yes from 1998
Concert Reviews
ABC - Live In Chicago-October 27th, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
Touring the US for the first time since 1985, ABC came out on stage and gave a very strong performance of their biggest hits and some lesser-known numbers.
Jon Anderson - A review of Jon Anderson's Earthmotherearth ballet presented as a poem
Review by Wendy Vig
Poem for Jon's ballet
Jon Anderson - Earth Mother Earth Ballet by Jon Anderson
Review by Anne Corbin
The Center for Performing Arts in SLO is very pretty - it reminds me of the one in San Jose. Our seats were in the Orchestra 4th row (which was actually about 10th or 11th row). We looked around the audience for familiar faces, but saw none. Most of the attendees must have been local people.
Black Sabbath - Live in Chicago, January 19, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
Black Sabbath really invented the genre of heavy metal, and, to this day performs the genre in a way that many have copied but none have duplicated.
Blue Öyster Cult - Live in Rockford, IL, September 6th, 1998
Review by Gary Hill
Although not actually progressive rock, BOC have always presented progressive influences into their particular brand of metal/hard-rock.
Bruford Levin Upper Extremities - Live in Chicago, December 9, 1998
Review by Gary Hill
This was the last show of the latest leg of BLUE`s tour. If this band makes it back on to the road again, do whatever it takes to see them.
Alice Cooper - Live In Milwaukee, August 7, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
As the Cooper show began, a large, robotic presence was seen on the stage. He told us of his quest to destroy Alice Cooper and his evil.
The Deadlights - Live Ozzfest, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Taking the stage to a segment of dialog from the Stephen King film The Shining, the Deadlights came out to give a scorching, if brief set.
Dio - Live In Chicago, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
There was a time when Ronnie James Dio was one of the most well-known and respected vocalists in the heavy metal genre. His fame may have faded a bit, but several things have not.
Doro - Live In Chicago, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
As front woman of German metal band Warlock, Doro Pesch proved that she had a metal voice that would hold up with any of the male singers of the time. After that band was no more, Doro has continued by proving that she still has the same vocal power, but also by moving on in different directions as well.
Dream Theater - Live at the Marcus Amphitheater-August 24th, 1998
Review by Gary Hill
Dream Theater proved that, even as an opening act, they are to be taken seriously in the prog world. In fact, they made a very strong argument for deserving to be placed at a higher point on the bill, meaning no disrespect to the other bands that performed at the show.
Dream Theater - Live at the Riviera Theater, Chicago IL, August 12, 2000
Review by Steve Alspach
Dream Theater were on their Metropolis 2000 tour, and they performed a number of songs from their latest album, "Scenes From a Memory", but they performed a solid two hour-twenty minute show that never let up in intensity. The band opened with "Metropolis" from their most recent album.
Dream Theater - Live at the Vic Theater, Chicago, Illinois May 13, 1998
Review by Gary Hill
The debate as to whether or not Dream Theater is progressive/art rock still rages on. After seeing this show, I cast my ballot in the "are" category.
Dream Theater - Live In Chicago, February 13th, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
When a band releases a concept album, there is always the temptation to come out on tour and do the entire album from beginning to end. Quite a few bands have tried it.
Emerson, Lake and Palmer - Live at the Marcus Amphitheater-August 24th,1998
Review by Gary Hill
The only pyrotechnics were not the flares on the stage or the lightning that sparked across the late summer sky. Emerson, Lake and Palmer produced musical fireworks in their own inimitable style.
Enuff Z'nuff - Live In Rockford, IL December 4th, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
Combining a wide variety of musical styles, Enuff Z'Nuff came out and gave a strong performance for this enthusiastic audience. The Z'Nuff sound live seems to take in such diverse modes as punk, metal, pop and rock into a tapestry that gets the listener on their feet.
Godsmack - Live-Ozzfest 1999, East Troy, WI
Review by Gary Hill
This hard rocking outfit very nearly stole the show from everyone at Ozzfest. Their angry and powerful brand of metal translates very well to the live venue.
Trey Gunn - Live In Chicago, September 6th, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Trey Gunn and his cohorts came into Chicago and showed that they are definitely masters of their craft. The group performed a number of tracks from Trey's various releases.
Hair of The Dog - Live In Rockford, IL June 2, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
This band just plain loves rock and roll. You can see it in the enthusiasm they put into their live show. That enthusiasm carries over to the crowd, guaranteeing a good time for all.
Halford - Live In Milwaukee, 2000
Review by Mike Korn
How many of you can say you've seen a god in concert before?

Halford - Live In Milwaukee, October 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Hell bent for leather again, the metal god returns. After playing a supporting role on the recent Iron Maiden tour, Halford is back out, this time headlining.
Harmony Riley - Live in Rockford, IL, April 28th, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
This band is extremely tight. The live sound of Harmony Riley seems quite hard to pigeon hole. At times, one thinks ofartists as diverse as Jimi Hendrix, Dave Matthews and the Allman Brothers.
Iron Maiden - Live In Milwaukee, 2000
Review by Steve Colombo
One of Heavy Metal's founding fathers played Milwaukee's Marcus Amphitheater in August-and let their presence be felt by a major audience for the first time in almost ten years. As the trends in music have changed from grunge to Latin to boy bands, too many great artists have gotten left in the wayside in favor of what's new and hot.
Kansas - Live at Taste of Chicago, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Kansas is a band that started as one of the premiere progressive rock bands of America. As many prog bands did, they drifted into the sea of pop music, diluting their prog sensibilities and gaining wide market appeal for their efforts.
Kiss - Live In Rockford, IL, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
This tour is being billed as the "Farewell Tour". Consider this reviewer a bit skeptical about whether or not the band will actually retire. However, they really are putting their all into the performance this time out.
Tony Levin - Live in Chicago-June 23rd, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Tony Levin and company did two shows for Chicago on June 23rd. The set consisted mostly of material from his new release Waters of Eden.
The Mollys - Live Rockford, IL, September 3rd, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
The Mollys are rock solid proof that there are strong common threads throughout folk music the world over.
Mötley Crüe - Live at Alpine Valley, August 18, 2000
Review by Brian Angotti
On tour to support their latest effort "New Tattoo.", Motley Crue is bringing back the essentials for a real rock and roll show.
Mötley Crüe - Live at Alpine Valley, July 18th, 1999
Review by Nicole Miesner and Gary Hill
Kicking off the show with In The Beginning segueing into Shout at the Devil, the Crue tore into a rousing set on this Wisconsin summer evening.
Ozone Quartet - Live In NC, January 13th, 2000
Review by Vivian Lee
At 11:45 Ozone Quartet filled the night with jazz-fusion grooves. The one woman, three man group from Raleigh NC was playing at Chapel Hill's The Local 506 in support of their latest CD, Nocturne.
Ozric Tentacles - Live In Milwaukee, WI 2000
Review by Gary Hill
The Ozrics came to Milwaukee and brought their particular brand of space rock to an appreciative audience. The band’s style seems to combine elements of Hawkwind with harder almost metallic elements, Grateful Deadish jamming and a solid prog sensibility.
Poison - Live July 2000
Review by Brian Angotti
With last years successful summer reunion tour under their belts the original glam slam kings of noise decided to do it again. The band are embarking on city after city with co-headliners Cinderella and support acts Dokken and Slaughter this year.
Puya - Live at Ozzfest, 1999 - East Troy, WI
Review by Gary Hill
Puya put on a very entertaining and credible performance for the Ozzfest audience. It was a bit of a unique show compared to many of the other bands due to the band's eclectic choice of influences.
Queensrÿche - Live In Milwaukee August 26th, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Many old school Queensryche fans have not been overly pleased with their recent recordings and have been hoping for a return to the older harder sound. If this concert was any indication, the band is listening.
Rush - Live in Milwaukee, WI, June 13, 1997
Review by Gary Hill
Realizing that many do not consider Rush to be a progressive band, I should preface this by saying that I feel that there are periods of Rush music that certainly qualify as progressive. Since they were performing two of the epics from that period on this tour, I felt that this review qualifies as progressive rock.
Saxon - Live Waunakee, WI, November, 2000
Review by Mike Korn
Where the hell is Waunakee, Wisconsin? That must have been what the members of Saxon were asking themselves when they saw this gig on their itinerary.
Skunk Anansie - Live Rockford, IL, September, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
Skunk Anansie differs from many of the newer hard-edged bands in the aspect of versatility. They can cover the  aggressive, crunchy territory every bit as well as the Korns of the world, but also do mellow quite effectively
Spock's Beard - Live in Chicago IL, August, 2000
Review by Steve Alspach
Opening for Dream Theater, Spock's Beard played a surprisingly short set. With their new album, "V" due out shortly, one would think that the band would have played a few songs from that album, but it wasn't to be. 
Spock's Beard - Live In Chicago, May, 1999
Review by Gary Hill and Steve Alspach
Who says that progressive rock can`t be fun and funny? Certainly not Spock`s Beard.
Star People - Live In Milwaukee 2000
Review by Gary Hill
How many of us can say that we have seen extraterrestrials perform live music?
Tempest - Live At Celtic Fest, Chicago, September, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
More pics from this show are available in our members' area.
Union - Live in Chicago- April, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
Union delivered a scorching set to the enthusiastic crowd at Chicago's House Of Blues. The band came out and showed that they were a band that really can deliver live what they promise in the studio.
Yes - Live at Taste of Chicago, July 8th, 2000
Review by Gary Hill
A true dream come true for Yes fans, the Masterworks Yes tour featured three, count 'em, three epics. They included two seldom played gems.
Yes - Live at the World Music Theater-July 9th, 1998
Review by Gary Hill
The magic is back. There is seemingly a growing underground progressive rock movement.
Yes - Live In Milwaukee, November 13, 1999
Review by Gary Hill
This band just keeps getting better. Yes gave a wonderful performance on a Saturday night in Milwaukee. The stage show, featuring a screen behind the band that most of the night featured computer graphics, rivaled the light shows of Hawkwind.
Yes - Live in Milwaukee-November 15th, 1997
Review by Gary Hill
For me, this Yes tour was the best that I have ever seen. I should explain that statement by saying that, although I have been an avid Yes fan since 1975, I did not get the opportunity to see them until the 90125 tour. Therefore, I did miss many of what diehard Yes fans consider to be their best outings.
 
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