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October 2006 - Issue 60
Progressive Rock CD Reviews
Adult Party Experience - Overpenetration
Review by Gary Hill
This album is a bit unusual – OK, a lot. One only has to listen to the weird psycho fusion mix on this disc for a short time to figure that it fits into the genre of hard rocking instrumental prog that has a healthy dosage of jazz in the mix.
AKLO - Beyond Madness
Review by Gary Hill
Eric Sandberg is the musician who works under the name of AKLO. With this disc he has created a tribute to the works of Howard Phillips Lovecraft.
AKLO - Unnamable
Review by Gary Hill
The second release by Eric Sandberg under the name AKLO, this one continues the creepy musical themes based on the works of H. P. Lovecraft that were begun on Beyond Madness. I’d have to say that I like this one better than its predecessor.
Anthropia - Ereyn Chronicles: Part 1 the Journey of Beginnings
Review by Gary Hill
Magna Carta has always been known as a progressive rock label. Mind you a lot of prog purists have always thought that the bulk of their output had too much metal in it for their tastes.
Big Dixon - Big Dixon
Review by Lorraine Kay
Big Dixon is four guys that just seem to have fun playing music. Fronting the band on lead vocals is David Mcbee, while John Fusco handles the guitars and background vocals.
Borg Symphony - Ode to Hero Tixe
Review by Lorraine Kay
This is a musical symphony, not merely tracks of music. The music is played by a Performance Art Group based in Los Angeles.
Canvas Solaris - Penumbra Diffuse
Review by Gary Hill
Fans of instrumental prog that has elements of both metal and fusion should eat this up. While the overall musical motif runs to such inspiration as King Crimson and Dream Theater, these guys create their own brand of heavy technical music.
Degree Absolute - Degree Absolute
Review by Greg Olma
I am amazed by the sheer number of great bands that still come out with quality CDs. Sure, there is a lot of trash coming out, but mixed in there is a lot of quality music.
Keith Emerson - Off the Shelf
Review by Steve Alspach
I read a review on Amazon – I don’t remember precisely where – that said that just because someone is talented that doesn’t make him good, and the reviewer named ELP as an example. Ergo, Keith Emerson is talented but not good.
Estradasphere - Palace of Mirrors
Review by Gary Hill
I’ve read reviews of this CD that say that lineup changes have hit the band hard and as a result this is the weakest disc they’ve released. If that’s the case, these guys must be one of the best progressive rock bands ever.
Steve Hackett - Wild Orchids
Review by Steve Alspach
While Messrs. Banks, Rutherford, Collins and Gabriel release albums at a snail's pace, leave it to Genesis' no. 2 ex-guitarist to take the lion's share of post-Genesis releases. Wild Orchids finds Steve mining the same fertile grounds that he did for To Watch the Storms.
Hamster Theatre - The Public Execution of Mister Personality / Quasi Day Room - Live at the Moore Theater
Review by Gary Hill
I happen to be a big fan of small rodents (we actually have three hamsters now), so when I saw that Hamster Theatre was releasing this album, I was interested based on the name alone. The music here is not the type of thing that would be my first choice for listening, though.
Hauteville - Relief Data Incomplete
Review by Gary Hill
This French band have released an intriguing album. The female vocals here are strong, and that is always a nice touch.
Inquisitor Betrayer - Space Elevator
Review by Gary Hill
Dale Kay and Wes Antczak are Inquisitor Betrayer. As the liner notes to their CD makes very clear, they share several major musical inspirations for this project.
Liquid Village - All At Once
Review by Gary Hill
While this disc might not be an easy one to throw into progressive rock, there are enough prog elements here to warrant its inclusion in the category. Indeed, while this band is certainly beholden to jam bands like the Grateful Dead, they also owe a debt to Yes and their progressive rock ilk.
Tony Lowe - And Allison Fleming-All of the Above
Review by Lorraine Kay
This is an amazing concept CD. Each track composed and produced by Tony Lowe and Allison Fleming is influenced by the colors in the visible spectrum corresponding with a mood that it is experienced when listening to the songs, which move through different musical styles; including rock, pop, acoustic and orchestral.
Matching Mole - March
Review by Steve Alspach
Robert Wyatt once said in a “Musician” magazine article that getting sacked from Soft Machine was more painful to talk about than the “accident” in June 1973 that left him without the use of his legs. Now that’s painful.
A Melodic Daydream - Pool or the Pond EP
Review by Gary Hill
While I’m not positive about the progressive rock categorization on this one, there are a couple tracks here that seem pretty definite about it. This five song EP includes two pieces that have a definite atmospheric prog rock tunes.
Steve Miller - Children of the Future
Review by Gary Hill
You’ll note that I’ve put this album in the “progressive rock” category. Do I consider Steve Miller to be a prog rock act? Overall, the answer would be a definite “no.”
Nektar - Recycled (Remaster)
Review by Gary Hill
In the world of '70's progressive rock there are the clear leaders of the pack, bands like Genesis, Yes, Kansas and King Crimson. These groups achieved both critical and commercial succes while producing their brand of the complex musical form.
Phideaux - The Great Leap
Review by Gary Hill
I’ve been trying to work Phideaux (the older releases) into Music Street Journal for a while. So, it’s a happy coincidence that I received the new CD in the process of creating the new issue.
Project Morfeo - Dicotomia
Review by Gary Hill
While this disc might be called gothic or even techno music, I think there are enough shades of dark prog acts like Blackfield to include it in the progressive rock section. While this disc is gloomy and melancholy it is also quite beautiful and eloquent.
Ruthless Orfanz - Examish
Review by Gary Hill
Let’s make this point perfectly clear – progressive rock purists will hate this. They will consider it to have nothing prog about it.
Saga - Trust
Review by Lorraine Kay
Saga outdid themselves on this, their latest studio CD. After 30 years they have not lost any freshness in their music.
Septimania - Welcome To Septimania
Review by Gary Hill
A gent named Jonathan Thomas recruited a group of cohorts to produce this disc. I have to tell you, this isn’t really my cup of tea, but I know that there are a number of prog heads out there who are into just this type of music.
The Station Myth - The Station Myth
Review by Gary Hill
While this may not be the type of music you first associate with progressive rock, this fits pretty well into that category. This is moody music, but more along the lines of later Radiohead, modern Marillion and Blackfield.
The Sunny Era - Connection Lost
Review by Gary Hill
In many ways there seems now to be more of a current of breaking down musical barriers than there has been at any other time in history. Take this CD for an example.
David Sylvian - Brilliant Trees/Words With The Shaman
Review by Steve Alspach
With the demise of Japan (the band, not the nation, y’all), David Sylvian launched his solo career with Brilliant Trees. Some of the songs still have a dated feel to them, but it shows Sylvian to branch out musically.
David Sylvian - Secrets of The Beehive
Review by Steve Alspach
After the ambient efforts of Gone to Earth, Secrets of the Beehive found David Sylvian in a warm, almost romantic mood. Enlisting the arrangement talents of Ryuichi Sakamoto, this disc serves as an excellent starter to Sylvian and his music. The rich strings, coupled with Sylvian’s baritone, along with a curious lack of drums, envelop the listener.
Traffic - The Low Spark of High Heeled Boys
Review by Steve Alspach
Somewhere in Steve Winwood’s career, between the blue-eyed teen soul of “I’m a Man” and “Gimme Some Lovin’” to the made-for-the-80s albums of Arc of a Diver and Back in the High Life came a little bit of exploration.
Trespass - Morning Lights
Review by Gary Hill
If you are like me this band’s name will make you think of early Genesis. Certainly the album cover helps to contribute to that comparison, too.
The Unquiet Void - Poisoned Dreams
Review by Gary Hill
While I’m not 100 percent certain about putting this disc into the category of progressive rock, certainly the electronic, ambient texture is in keeping with some of the material of a number of the more sedate prog bands. When you consider that the uneasy nature of the music it certainly doesn’t fit into what you would think of as “new age.”
Variant - Beyond Jargon
Review by Gary Hill
This disc isn’t for everyone. Certainly those who prefer their progressive rock in the traditional old-school format will not get this.
Various Artists - Got Prog? - Sampler 1
Review by Greg Olma
Sampler compilations are always sketchy endeavors. I for one would not want to compile one myself. My tastes are far too wide and I would be thinking of what I like and not what I thought fits best.
Wastefall - Self Exile
Review by Gary Hill
Prog purists will certainly steer clear of this one. That’s really a shame because these guys have created a very intriguing blend of sounds that marries the Lacuna Coil style of modern metal with the Dream Theater school of neo-prog.
Wetton Manzanera - One World
Review by Gary Hill
In the late 1980’s two prog rock greats in the personage of John Wetton and Phil Manzanera recorded this disc. Let’s make one point clear here. This is included in the prog section based on who these guys are (and what the rest of their catalog is like).
White Willow - Signal To Noise
Review by Gary Hill
Lead vocalist Trude Eidtang’s vocal performance really steals the show on this disc. Considering how strong the music here is, that’s truly a statement as to her vocal prowess.
Robert Wyatt - Rock Bottom
Review by Steve Alspach
On June 1, 1973, Robert Wyatt discovered the near-fatal combination of alcohol, an open window, and gravity. Being confined to a wheelchair (to this day), Wyatt scrapped plans for his Matching Mole project and developed his songs with a wider set of musicians.
Yanni - Live – The Concert Event
Review by Gary Hill
Yanni – yeah, I know all the jokes that go around about this guy. The thing is, this music is really good.
John Young Band - Live at the Classic Rock Society 2003
Review by Lorraine Kay
This live recording of the John Young Band is a great sampling of what John Young is about. With John Young out front on vocals and keyboards this sexy offering is one that should be added to all prog-rock collections.
Metal/Prog Metal CD Reviews
Robin Beck - Do You Miss Me
Review by Greg Olma
It has to be hard to not be yourself in this crazy music business. You constantly have to re-invent yourself to keep the music buying public interested.
Celtic Frost - Monotheist
Review by Mike Korn
In the 16 years since Celtic Frost released their last studio album Vanity/Nemesis, the metal scene has recreated itself so many times that 1990 probably seems more like fifty years ago. Not that keeping up with the Joneses ever mattered to Celtic Frost...they have always existed "outside" of even the underground metal phenomena.
Destiny's End - Transition
Review by Gary Hill
I first came across the band Destiny’s End when I was doing research for my book on Lovecraftian music. H. P. Lovecraft expert S. T. Joshi mentioned them to me. Eventually I got in touch with Perry Grayson (guitarist for the band) and he sent me copies of their CD’s along with his new band Falcon.
Giuntini Project - III
Review by Gary Hill
II saw a show on metal the other day (a rather cool documentary). In it Rob Zombie says something to the effect that no one can create anything new in heavy metal as far as riffs because Black Sabbath (and specifically Tony Iommi) already did all the cool ones.
Headrush - Headrush
Review by Greg Olma
I read on the web that this band is a “power metal band from Italy”. That statement shows how the internet can be a good thing and a bad thing at the same time.
Iron Maiden - A Matter of Life and Death
Review by Rick Damigella
The mighty Iron Maiden unleashes its third new studio album of the 21st century and its fourteenth overall with A Matter of Life and Death.
Iron Maiden - Killers
Review by Rick Damigella
Set the way back machine for 1981. The New Wave of British Heavy Metal was on and the brightest stars of the era were Iron Maiden.
Lamb of God - Sacrament
Review by Mike Korn
With a name such as Lamb of God and an album title like Sacrament, you'd expect this disc to be full of praise and worship. But there's definitely a wolf under this lamb's clothing.
Leatherwolf - World Asylum
Review by Mike Korn
I missed Leatherwolf the first time around. Their heyday was the mid to late 80's, a time when a million metal bands were fighting for the attention of headbangers everywhere.
Mahavatar - From the Sun, the Rain, the Wind, the Soil
Review by Greg Olma
I am glad to see that more female fronted bands are being taken seriously and getting major releases. Bands like Arch Enemy, Lacuna Coil, and Nightwish have opened the door for these new bands.
Rhapsody of Fire - Triumph or Agony
Review by Gary Hill
This type of metal has always been a mixed blessing for me. On the one hand I do appreciate the musicality and power that it manages to evoke.
Shadows Fade - Shadows Fade
Review by Greg Olma
It is always nice to see a local boy make good. Kevin Chalfant, an Illinois native, puts his stamp on another melodic rock CD. His voice was really made for this type of music.
Slayer - Christ Illusion
Review by Travis Jensen
There are many musical groups out there where you need to listen to a few tracks before you decide to spend your hard-earned cash on a new CD. Slayer is not one of those bands.
Tribuzy - Execution
Review by Greg Olma

  Hailing from Rio de Janeiro, Tribuzy is the band named after its main man Renato Tribuzy. This is the type of metal that is being played in places other than the United States.
Various Artists - Halloween Hootenanny
Review by Rick Damigella
A few years back, Rob Zombie started his own Zombie A Go-Go Records label. Amongst the first releases was this ghoulish treasure trove of tracks featuring some of the best and scariest “Zombified” music bubbling under the radar like a witches cauldron.
Various Artists - Nativity In Black
Review by Rick Damigella
  It is safe to say that while there were forces all happening simultaneously in music in the late 60’s, which would later be regarded as the elements from which heavy metal evolved. One band crawled forth, nay, stomped out of, the primordial ooze of the late sixties music scene to single handedly create an entirely new sound heretofore unheard coming from the speakers of stereos of the youth of the world.
Warfare - Hammer Horror
Review by Rick Damigella
What do you get when one of the loudest, nastiest bands to ride the first wave of punk/metal crossover with the English film “studio that dripped blood?” You get Warfare’s Hammer Horror.
Non-Prog CD Reviews
Carmine Appice - Ultimate Guitar Zeus
Review by Gary Hill
An album like this could be a tricky venture. Essentially the concept is a series of songs with the same basic core band.
TD Clark - Next Big Adventure
Review by Greg Olma
I had the pleasure of seeing TD Clark live opening up for Michael Schenker back in 2001. When I heard about this CD through a coworker, I thought to myself, “will it be as good as I remember it?”
Creature Feature - Creature Feature
Review by Gary Hill
For those looking for some music to crank out for their Halloween party, it’s hard to imagine finding much better than this. While overall this is somewhat typical techno rock with goth influences, they pull enough horror movie themes and textures into the mix to make it perfect for your fright fest.
The Creepniks - Graveyard Shindig
Review by Gary Hill
I discovered this band when I was working on my new book. The second track on the CD is inspired by H. P. Lovecraft, so it’s covered in more detail in that tome. Also, their main man Johnny Lockjaw shares some of his insights there.
Deep Purple - Rapture Of The Deep (Special Edition 2CD)
Review by Greg Olma
Deep Purple never seems to get the respect that they deserve. Everyone talks about Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath as the creators of the hard rock sound.
John Flynn - Dragon
Review by Gary Hill
There was a time when folk based rock ruled the airwaves. One thing that was pretty true about all of that music was that the songs conveyed a message that was more important than sex or drugs.
John Flynn - Two Wolves
Review by Gary Hill
John Flynn’s latest release sees him stretching out a bit. Mind you the majority of the disc is focused on his typical folk/country basis, but he opens it with a jazz ballad piece and finds other chances to move the boundaries of his music in new directions.
From The Inside - From The Inside
Review by Greg Olma
I first heard Danny Vaughn sing when he lent his vocal abilities to Waysted’s Save Your Prayers. At that time, I thought, “Oh no, Waysted have gone mellow”.
Ian Gillan - Gillan’s Inn
Review by Rick Damigella
Setting convention and professionalism aside for one moment… I am a card carrying Ian Gillan fan. I have seen him live numerous times, have listened to countless hours of his singing from throughout his storied career, from the Javelins through multiple incarnations fronting Deep Purple to his stint as Jesus.
Anthony Gomes - Music is the Medicine
Review by Lisa Palmeno
Anthony Gomes’ Music is the Medicine is innovative, imaginative, and completely original.
Kottak - Therupy
Review by Greg Olma
Kottak is the new side project by James Kottak (called Jimmy Ratchitt here) and his wife Athena. I had no clue as to what to expect except for the sticker on the CD saying it was “Cheap Trick meets Green Day on a bad day.”
Jerry Lee Lewis - Last Man Standing
Review by Lorraine Kay
After 60 years (almost to the day) from when he first walked into Sun Records, in Memphis, Tennessee, Jerry Lee Lewis is still rocking and rolling.
Gary Numan - Jagged
Review by Lorraine Kay
This long awaited Gary Numan CD Jagged is sure to become a classic with every track strong and thought provoking. The entire CD has the feel of a black and white, kind of artsy European film with a lot of scenes in dark narrow streets.
Matt O'Ree - Shelf Life
Review by Lorraine Kay
Shelf Life is Matt O’Ree’s third album and just like the two previous ones is a great showcase for the award-winning guitarist. O’Ree’s guitar playing has won him many accolades including the 2006 Guitarmageddon "King of the Blues" 2006.
Michael Schenker - Tales of Rock N Roll
Review by Greg Olma
This is a difficult album for me to review. I have been a fan of Michael Schenker’s since 1979 when I first heard UFO’s Obsession.
Steely Dan - The Definitive Collection
Review by Gary Hill
I’ve been wanting to work Steely Dan into Music Street Journal for a long time. I keep trying repeatedly to fit one of the older releases in as a retro review, but it just never happens.
Various Artists - Drum Nation Volume 3
Review by Gary Hill
With the latest entry in the Drum Nation series Magna Carta has changed the rules. First, this disc is not progressive rock, by any means.
Warrior Soul - Drugs, God and the New Republic
Review by Greg Olma
The second album by any band is the most anticipated and criticized. If you stick to your tried and true sound, you get blasted for not progressing.
DVD/Video Reviews
Ginger Baker - Ginger Baker In Africa DVD
Review by Greg Olma
I had heard about this film years ago when I was looking for Cream material. It has finally come out on DVD and although you will find it in the music section of most video stores, this film is really more of a documentary.
James Brown - Live in Montreux 1981 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
When it’s James Brown how much do you really need to say? The man is the Godfather of Soul, and for that style of music it just doesn’t get much better than this.
Gary Burton - and Makoto Ozone – Live at Montreux 2002 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
So you say you like jazz? I’m talking about the traditional jazz stylings.
Canned Heat - Live at Montreux 1973 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
Canned Heat were one of the cooler bluesy hard rock acts of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. Certainly there name has become something of a legend over the years.
Eric Clapton - Live at Montreux 1986 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
Eric Clapton might well be one of the highest rated guitarists in the business. Sometimes his talent deserves those accolades.
Coldplay - XYX – The Story Behind DVD
Review by Gary Hill
The latest release in the unauthorized series of biographies on Locomotive, this time they turn their attention to Coldplay. As one might guess when that word “unauthorized” is in the title, they aren’t able to use music from the band.
Jeff Healey - Jeff Healey Band – Live at Montreux 1999 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
This whole Live at Montreux series is pretty amazing. They really have put the effort into creating some choice live DVD’s of some stellar performances.
Nickelback - Pictures DVD
Review by Gary Hill
I wouldn’t be reviewing this DVD if I thought that it was a total waste. We don’t do negative reviews – if we don’t like something more than dislike it we just won’t cover it.
Carl Palmer - In Concert DVD
Review by Lorraine Kay
Simply titled “The Carl Palmer Band In Concert,” their new DVD is a must have for any ELP or prog rock fan. The release presents their concert from start to finish as they performed it on September 5, 2004 at the Bucharest Sports Arena in Romania.
The Pixies - Acoustic: Live In Newport DVD
Review by Gary Hill
I have to say that I approached this DVD with both anticipation and a little trepidation. I’ve always liked the Pixies quite a bit, but part of what I found so intriguing about them was the wall of distorted sound that they created.
Rainbow - Live in Munich 1977 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
In my opinion the quintessential Rainbow album is Long Live Rock ‘n’ Roll. Well, this DVD opens with “Kill the King” from that album and we also get the title track.
Nina Simone - Live at Montreux 1976 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
I had heard the name Nina Simone, and knew that the lady was talented. Until this DVD, though, I had never heard her.
Various Artists - Rock For Asia DVD
Review by Greg Olma
Musicians in general are some of the most charitable people on earth. They use their fame to raise money and create awareness for the pet causes.
Suzanne Vega - Live at Montreux 2004 DVD
Review by Gary Hill
Yeah, you probably know her for “Luka” and the remix version of “Tom’s Diner.” The thing is, Suzanne Vega is so much more than those two songs.
Wetton Downes - Icon Acoustic TV Broadcast DVD
Review by Gary Hill
John Wetton and Geoff Downes playing in an intimate acoustic setting, how can you go wrong? From what I can tell, you can’t.
The White Stripes - Rhinoceros DVD
Review by Gary Hill
I have to say that this series of DVD biographies is a bit of a mixed bag. On the one hand it’s nice that they put these things out to give people a glimpse into the history of these various bands. The thing is, since they are unauthorized they don’t have actual music from the artist.
Interviews
Altera Enigma
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Jason De Ron of Altera Enigma - October, 2006
Analog Missionary
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with The Mark of Analog Missionary from 2006


Carmine Appice
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Carmine Appice from 2006
Michael Barry-Rec
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Michael Barry-Rec from 2006
Big Dixon
Interview by Lorraine Kay
Interview with David McBee of Big Dixon from 2006
TD Clark
Interview by Greg Olma
Interview with TD Clark from 2006
Dream Aria
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Donald Stagg of Dream Aria from 2006


Hammers of Misfortune
Interview by Mike Korn
Interview with John Cobbett of Hammers of Misfortune from 2006 
Kino
Interview by Lorraine Kay
Interview with John Mitchell of Kino
Kopecky
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Joe Kopecky of Kopecky from 2006
Kottak
Interview by Greg Olma
Interview with Jimmy Ratchitt of Kottak from 2006
Tony Lowe
Interview by Lorraine Kay
Interview With Tony Lowe From 2006
Magic Pie
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Gilbert Marshall of Magic Pie From 2006
The Marsh
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with The Marsh From 2006

Editor's Note: This interview was conducted via email  and several of the answers the group wanted credited to all of them. We normally don't do this but I am honoring their wishes.
Nox Arcana
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Joseph Vargo of Nox Arcana from 2006
Gary Numan
Interview by Lorraine Kay
Interview with Gary Numan from 2006
Michael Sadler
Interview by Lorraine Kay
Interview with Michael Sadler of Saga from 2006
Soulfly
Interview by Travis Jensen
Interview with Joe Nunez of Soulfly From 2006
Steve Thorne
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Steve Thorne from 2006
Variant
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview with Jerry Wengert of Variant from 2006
Wolverine
Interview by Gary Hill
Interview With Stefan Zell of Wolverine From 2006
John Young Band
Interview by Lorraine Kay
Interview with John Young from 2006


Concert Reviews
Ian Gillan - Live in L. A., September 2006
Review by Rick Damigella
What does Ian Gillan do on a brief summer vacation from Deep Purple’s current world tour? Go on tour of course!
Gary Numan - Live In Anaheim California, August 2006
Review by Lorraine Kay
Gary Numan blew the socks off the audience at the Anaheim House of Blues last month, August 23, when he introduced his latest CD, Jagged. The concert ended the first installment of the Jagged North American Tour that began Jul 31 in Detroit, MI. at the Majestic Theater.
Queensr├┐che - Live in Chicago, IL, September, 2006
Review by Greg Olma
I was lucky enough to catch one of Queensryche’s 3 shows in Chicago. Billed as the complete Operation Mindcrime saga (Parts I and II) with actors, this was going to be a night of Broadway, Queensryche style.
Book Reviews
Various Artists - The Strange Sound of Cthulhu: Music Inspired by the Writings of H.P. Lovecraft written by Gary Hill
Review by Lisa Palmeno
A bit of an editorial comment needs to be made here. Since the person you see as "ed." - that's "editor" not "Ed" - is the author of this book, this is a bit awkward in a way. I had considered not covering this book at MSJ, but that seems unfair as we do provide promotion in the form of reviews for other authors.
 
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