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Non-Prog CD Reviews

Brian Parrish

Traveller

Review by Gary Hill

Brian Parrish is possibly best known for his work as part of the band Badger. This new solo album shows that he’s got what it takes to deliver great music on his own, though. If you were to just listen to the first song or two, you might think that this is an AOR prog disc. The first part of the album fits in that category. Beyond that, though, this is more of a mainstream blues rock disc. It’s a very strong one, too.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2016  Volume 4 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Land of the Night Games

This comes in mellow, atmospheric and trippy. It works to a great fairly mellow groove for the song proper. There is a definite Pink Floyd kind of thing here, but with more of a psychedelic rock edge. The chorus hooks and other elements seem to bring an AOR rock element, too.

Talk To Me
This has a harder edged groove that’s very tasty. I really dig the tasty guitar solo later in the piece. Perhaps this is more mainstream rock than prog, but there are elements that make me think of both Pink Floyd and Supertramp in some ways.
Kandy Road

A bluesy rock tune, this is another classy number. I love the guitar sounds on this thing. There are some hints of psychedelia at times, along with hints of world music and prog. The world music jam at the end is definitely progressive, if perhaps not progressive rock. Either way it’s great.

When It’s Over
A pure old school blues rock jam brings this into being. There is a bit of a Grateful Dead vibe to it in some ways, too. There is definitely a soulful thing at play here. This cut has no prog at all in the mix. It’s closer, perhaps, to something Eric Clapton might do than it is to anything else.
Traveller
Now, this blues tune is classy for sure. I like the retro organ, and the whole thing feels like an electric blues thing from the 1970s. It’s quite cool. The female vocals add a lot, but the tune just oozes cool, anyway.
Slow Riding
The horns really add a lot to this. There is a lot of funk along with soul and more. It’s very mush a 70s kind of groove. It’s classy stuff, too.  
Blue
A slower, mellower pure blues tune, this is so strong. It has some especially tasty guitar soloing.
The Time Will Come
Here’s a more energized, but no less bluesy tune. It’s a cool rocker that is very much a timeless kind of thing. Again Eric Clapton is a good reference.
Summer Day
 A mainstream rocker, this still has a lot of blues in the blueprint. It’s a solid rocker. It’s not one of my favorites here, though. The saxophone solo is a nice touch.
Angel of Death
More of a pure blues tune, this has a lot of Eric Clapton in the mix along with some BB King. This is one of my favorites of the set.
Love Like This
There is a bit of a country edge to this mellower tune. It’s another class act, though.
Don't Waste My Time
There is something a bit like Pink Floyd in this tune, too. That’s tempered by more of a pure blues sound. Either way, this another cool tune. It has some nice touches for sure.
Diamonds and Pearls
Folk and country merge on this mellower number. It’s very old school in sound.
 
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