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Non-Prog CD Reviews

Tokyo Rosenthal

Afterlife

Review by Gary Hill

When approaching a new Tokyo Rosenthal album, it’s a pretty safe bet what you are going to get. His discs are generally filled with a mix of folk, rock and country. This is no exception. It’s a solid album without any real surprises. Of course, do you really need surprises when it’s this good?

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2015  Volume 6 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
The Bunk House

Folk and country merge on this catchy number.

Bury My Ashes
Without a huge difference, there is more bluegrass here. The arrangement is more involved, too. I like the violin on this.
Shreveport
The opening to this is intricate and almost proggy. The cut has more of a folk rock vibe to it.
The Cold War
Zydeco, Latin music and folk merge on this bouncy little number.
Back Stage Hotel
This piece seems to combine the folk rock of the 1970s with some country and more. It’s an effective piece on a strong album.
The Pearl
Gentle and intricate, this song is pretty. It has a lot of folk music along with some progressive rock and some country in the mix.
Afterlife
With some intricate picked guitar and harmonica, this is very much a country song. It’s quite down home in nature. It’s also a highlight of the set.
What Would Have Happened?
This is a sad and quite pretty ballad. It’s very much a country styled song. It’s also another standout tune.
Love's Hurtin' Real Bad
An energetic folk rocker, this has blues and country both in the mix. It’s one of the stronger pieces, too..
All in Time
Folk rock is the concept here. This is fairly effective, but not as strong as the last few tracks
 
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