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Progressive Rock CD Reviews

Blackmore's Night

Ghost Of A Rose

Review by Larry Toering

Looking back on Blackmore’s Night’s catalog, this happens to remain at the top of their best releases, and it is surely a fan favorite. At the time it was getting interesting for this act, as they started to really shine together and stretch out musically. All of a sudden they seemed to be taking themselves more seriously, and were being taken more seriously by their fans as a result. They continued to fuse medieval and pop together but began to turn up the volume and emphasize rock a little more on this record, which found them at a better balance than on their previous releases.

This review is available in book format (hardcover and paperback) in Music Street Journal: 2013  Volume 2 at lulu.com/strangesound.

Track by Track Review
Way To Mandalay
The synth guitar intro instantly grabs you here and doesn't let go, as the song plays out like some kind of fantastic journey. This is awesome and one of their more creative songs, at least to me.
3 Black Crows

This isn't too bad, it just never really did anything for me. I suppose it appeals to the less Ritchie Blackmore oriented fans, like a good two thirds of their catalog probably does.

Diamonds And Rust

No matter how you slice it, this is a great song by anyone who does it. I happen to love the way Blackmore makes it his own here by featuring the melody, talk about fantastic. It's as spooky as I think the song was meant to be. This is awesome!

Cartouche

This is a number with which they were opening shows at the time. It shows the band really on fire for the most part on what is otherwise just a typical track for them.

Queen For A Day (Part 1)

Not one of my favorite moments on the disc, this isn't bad, and it is a highlight for Candice Night.

Queen For A Day (Part 2)
This is much more like it, as Blackmore gets to stretch out quite a bit. However, it’s on what I consider to be a rather repetitive guitar line.
Ivory Tower

This is perhaps the most medieval point of the record. A bit of chanting makes this a very dark number. Once again it's not bad, but nothing I find to be spectacular, either.

Nur Eine Minute

This is definitely not a highlight number, just another traditional instrumental song.

Ghost Of A Rose

If there really is an epic point on the album, this would have to be it for me. It rings of a movie soundtrack that I can't exactly put my finger on, but I think the arrangement was lifted from the same thing. This is where Candice Night proves she can sing a good tune when she wants to.

Mr. Peagram's Morris And Sword

This is the album's token guitar instrumental piece, and once again it's nothing spectacular, but hey, it's Ritchie Blackmore.

Lorely

This is the best track of this kind on offer. I like everything about it from its traditional to its modern factors.

Where Are We Going From Here

Another typical track for them, this is probably the low point of the disc for me. It seems to serve more as filler.

Rainbow Blues

The Jethro Tull classic gets a great reworking here. In fact, I like this version just a little better, and that isn't easy to accomplish. But they somehow divide it up into equally featured parts of beautiful guitar and vocals. This is where the disc starts to peak for me.

All For One

This is one of the best moments in the whole set, as they go Three Musketeer style, complete with bagpipes. The ultimate drinking song, this is excellent!

Dandelion Wine

This is a lovely ballad to close what is more or less a great album that stands the test of time. Once again Blackmore features some sublime acoustic work with which to close it.

 
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